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COVID-19: News and Campus Updates

English

The Department of English offers students the opportunity to follow their passion for reading and writing. Our English programs ground students in the knowledge and practice of cultural, literary, and rhetorical interpretation and history, and offer them the platforms to develop into highly proficient academic, creative, and professional writers.

In addition, we train teachers in a variety of pedagogical models and encourage them to reflect critically upon the teaching profession and their place therein. We produce literate citizens and teachers of exceptional merit, with the ability to interpret and contextualize acts of signification in relation to their conditions of production and reception.

Contact Us

Office: Ross 1284
Phone: (970) 351-2707

Dr. Andreas Mueller
Department Chair
Andreas.Mueller@unco.edu

Office Hours

8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Monday - Friday

Department News and Announcements

Mueller Cover Art Robinson Crusoe

Dr. Mueller Publishes Robinson Crusoe After 300 Years

The Department Chair of English, Dr. Andreas Mueller, has just published a new book! Check out Robinson Crusoe After 300 Years, a collection of essays suggesting new and unfamiliar ways of thinking about this most familiar of works, and who ask us to consider the enduring appeal of "Crusoe," more recognizable today than ever before.

Learn more about Robinson Crusoe AFter 300 Years

Melody Denny holds her award.

Writing Center Director Receives Prestigious Award

Melody Denny, a new Composition and Rhetoric faculty member and the current Director of the Writing Center, was presented with the Outstanding Article Award from the International Writing Centers Association for her article, "The Oral Writing-Revision Space: Identifying a New and Common Discourse Feature of Writing Center Consultations" which appeared in The Writing Center Journal. Congrats, Melody! We're glad to have you here and serving the students of the University of Northern Colorado! Learn more about the International Writing Centers Association at their website.

Sino-Enchantment, the Fantastic in Contemporary Chinese Cinemas

Professor Kenneth Chan Publishes New Book

Professor Kenneth Chan has published a new book with Edinburgh University Press entitled Sino-Enchantment: The Fantastic in Contemporary Chinese Cinemas (2021). Focusing on the increasing presence of fantastical elements in Hong Kong, Taiwanese, mainland Chinese, and transnational Chinese films through the theoretical lens of "Sino-enchantment," the book is the first of its kind in cinema studies.

Food and Feast in Premodern Outlaw Tales

Kristin Bovaird-Abbo, Director of Undergraduate Studies, Publishes Co-Edited Collection of Essays

“In Food and Feast in Premodern Outlaw Tales editors Melissa Ridley Elmes and Kristin Bovaird-Abbo gather eleven original studies examining scenes of food and feasting in premodern outlaw texts ranging from the tenth through the seventeenth centuries and forward to their cinematic adaptations. Along with fresh insights into the popular Robin Hood legend, these essays investigate the intersections of outlawry, food studies, and feasting in Old English, Middle English, and French outlaw narratives, Anglo-Scottish border ballads, early modern ballads and dramatic works, and cinematic medievalism. The range of critical and disciplinary approaches employed, including history, literary studies, cultural studies, food studies, gender studies, and film studies, highlights the inherently interdisciplinary nature of outlaw narratives.” More information about this publication can be found here.

Emily Forcier stands next to a poster detailing her research work

English MA Student Emily Forcier Presents Graduate Research

"My research focuses on the daily, disciplinary, and emotional labors of writing professionals at community colleges. The purpose of this study was to fill a research gap for more systematic and empirical research of the teaching English at community colleges. I wanted to learn about the experience of working in a community college setting and am hoping this knowledge can be shared with graduate students who may seek future employment at community colleges." 

Writing Center

We believe every writer needs a reader, and all writers, even strong writers, can benefit from visiting with a Writing Center Consultant. Our consultants come from a variety of majors and backgrounds and are trained to work with writing of all types, from all disciplines. You’re the content expert. We’re the writing experts. Let’s work together!

Writing Center Services

  • Free, confidential tutoring on an appointment-only basis
  • Tutoring assistance for all writing from essays to scholarship letters to doctoral dissertations
  • Help with all stages of the writing process
  • Help with understanding and using documentation styles
  • Useful handouts covering almost every writing concern from punctuation to documentation
  • Help for those writing in English as an additional language

Contact The Writing Center

Email: melody.denny@unco.edu or English@unco.edu 
Phone: 970-351-2056

Location: Ross Hall 1230

Writing Center Website

Regular Hours

Monday through Friday, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. by appointment

Wednesday, 6 p.m.- 8 p.m. walk-in
(Michener Library)

Saturday, 11 a.m. - 3 p.m. by appointment

Graduate Accountability Writing Group

Meets via Zoom on Mondays from 2:30-5:30 p.m. Those interested can email Melody Denny at melody.denny@unco.edu.

International Film Series

Administered by the English Department's Film Studies program, the International Film Series (IFS) at the University of Northern Colorado partners with campus groups and community organizations to bring you the very best international and domestic films! 

Films are screened on Wednesday and Thursday evenings in Lindou Auditorium (basement of Michener Library). Learn more about IFS.

 theater image

Students during history of book class

The History of Bookmaking

English 495, The History of the Book, demonstrates how books were created before the printing press.

Being able to get a true feeling of all the components of the book, from how it's made to how it began, has been immensely satisfying as an English major and fellow book lover.

Rory Harbert, Class of 2019

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