As students return to UNC this month, they’ll find familiar faces and a landscape that feels like home.

We’re hoping to welcome you back to campus as well! Some parts of campus may look different – others may look the same as when you were a student here. But one thing remains constant: For more than 125 years, this university has offered a beautiful landscape for learning, living and meeting lifelong friends.

And until you can plan your trip back, enjoy this gallery of images.

Originally built as the university’s boiler house and converted to the Arts Annex in 1963, this building provides studio and classroom space primarily for 3D visual arts, including ceramics, sculpting, metalsmithing, and jewelry.

Arts Annex

Originally built as the university’s boiler house and converted to the Arts Annex in 1963, this building provides studio and classroom space primarily for 3D visual arts, including ceramics, sculpting, metalsmithing, and jewelry.

Home to the University of Northern Colorado Cancer Rehabilitation Center, the first of its kind in the country, which offers training to students and health care professionals. More than 1,000 cancer survivors have been served by the center, and countless others helped by the important research advanced by faculty and students.

Ben Knighthorse Campbell Center

Home to the University of Northern Colorado Cancer Rehabilitation Center, the first of its kind in the country, which offers training to students and health care professionals. More than 1,000 cancer survivors have been served by the center, and countless others helped by the important research advanced by faculty and students.

Completed in 1974, Butler-Hancock houses UNC intercollegiate athletic offices and facilities, with the 2,700 spectator capacity in Bank of Colorado Arena.

Bank of Colorado Arena at Butler-Hancock Athletic Center

Completed in 1974, Butler-Hancock houses UNC intercollegiate athletic offices and facilities, with the 2,700 spectator capacity in Bank of Colorado Arena.

In Fall 2017, the Gender and Sexuality Resource Center moved to this house on 10th Avenue, which was named after philanthropist and friend Bonnie Phelps. The Center advocates for, educates with, and supports all identities across the gender, sexual, and romantic spectrums through an intersectional lens. 

Bonnie House

In Fall 2017, the Gender and Sexuality Resource Center moved to this house on 10th Avenue, which was named after philanthropist and friend Bonnie Phelps. The Center advocates for, educates with, and supports all identities across the gender, sexual, and romantic spectrums through an intersectional lens. 

Built in 1907 as the university’s library, it was renamed Carter Hall in 1944, and currently houses the university administration and accounting services, including the President’s Office, Provosts Office, Graduate School, Human Resources, IM&T, and University Advancement.

Carter Hall

Built in 1907 as the university’s library, it was renamed Carter Hall in 1944, and currently houses the university administration and accounting services, including the President’s Office, Provosts Office, Graduate School, Human Resources, IM&T, and University Advancement.

Added to campus in 1995, the Campus Recreation Center contains three multipurpose gyms, two group fitness rooms, exercise equipment, a climbing wall, a suspended track and UNC’s indoor swimming pool.

Campus Recreation Center

Added to campus in 1995, the Campus Recreation Center contains three multipurpose gyms, two group fitness rooms, exercise equipment, a climbing wall, a suspended track and UNC’s indoor swimming pool.

Completed in 2019, Campus Commons is the newest building on campus, located across 11th Avenue from North Hall. The building is a hub for students and prospective students, and houses financial aid, the registrar, the Office of Admissions and Visitor’s Center. It’s also a showcase for UNC’s world-class performing and visual arts programs with the performance hall and an art gallery. A new mural, created by UNC alumnus Armando Silva ’10, was installed in February, 2021.

Campus Commons

Completed in 2019, Campus Commons is the newest building on campus, located across 11th Avenue from North Hall. The building is a hub for students and prospective students, and houses financial aid, the registrar, the Office of Admissions and Visitor’s Center. It’s also a showcase for UNC’s world-class performing and visual arts programs with the performance hall and an art gallery. A new mural, created by UNC alumnus Armando Silva ’10, was installed in February, 2021.

Built in 1973, Candelaria Hall is home to the College of Humanities and Social Sciences, offering more than 40 undergraduate degrees ranging from Africana Studies to Spanish.

Candelaria Hall

Built in 1973, Candelaria Hall is home to the College of Humanities and Social Sciences, offering more than 40 undergraduate degrees ranging from Africana Studies to Spanish. The building is best known for the mural depicting the life of Martin Candelaria.

The 5,900 square-foot, 600-seat Performance Hall at Campus Commons allows for an all-inclusive, central space for performing arts, dance and music students to practice and perform, as well as a place for the community to come together and celebrate the arts.  It’s also home to several of UNC’s 96 new Steinway pianos, funded by generous donors who helped UNC attain the coveted All-Steinway School designation.

Performance Hall

The 5,900 square-foot, 600-seat Performance Hall at Campus Commons allows for an all-inclusive, central space for performing arts, dance and music students to practice and perform, as well as a place for the community to come together and celebrate the arts. It’s also home to several of UNC’s 96 new Steinway pianos, funded by generous donors who helped UNC attain the prestigious All-Steinway School designation.

Davis House is home to the Marcus Garvey Cultural Center.

Davis House

Davis House is home to the Marcus Garvey Cultural Center. As a Center focused on advocacy, the MGCC staff seek to create a space where students of color and historically marginalized groups feel connected to UNC and empowered throughout their collegiate experience.

The César Chávez Cultural Center is located in the Patton House and offers students who identify with the LatinX community support.

Patton House

The César Chávez Cultural Center is located in the Patton House and offers students who identify with the LatinX community support.

Empower Center Groundbreaking

Empower Center

Ground was broken in April 2021 for the Empower Center, UNC’s first fully donor-funded campus building. Expected to be open for student-athlete use in November, the $4 million, 10,250 square-foot facility more than doubles the space used in the previous facility and features a spacious weight room, new equipment, enhanced nutrition station, and offices for the strength and conditioning staff.

Ground was broken for Frasier Hall on November 19, 1951, and it was dedicated January 1, 1954. It’s home to the College of Performing and Visual Arts, and includes Langworthy Theatre, named in 1986 in honor of Helen Langworthy, who served as director of Little Theatre of the Rockies from its first season in 1934 until her retirement in 1965.

Frasier Hall

Ground was broken for Frasier Hall on November 19, 1951, and it was dedicated January 1, 1954. It’s home to the College of Performing and Visual Arts, and includes Langworthy Theatre, named in 1986 in honor of Helen Langworthy, who served as director of Little Theatre of the Rockies from its first season in 1934 until her retirement in 1965.

The cornerstone for Guggenheim Hall was laid September 24, 1910, and the building was completed in 1912. It’s a familiar building for students in Performing and Visual Arts.

Guggenheim Hall

The cornerstone for Guggenheim Hall was laid September 24, 1910, and the building was completed in 1912. It’s a familiar building for students in Performing and Visual Arts.

Construction began in September 1926 and was competed in 1928. Gunter’s original bell chimes were replaced with a second set in 1948. When the chimes stopped ringing in 1985 due to age and mechanical difficulties, a heartfelt grassroots campaign called “Bucks for Bells” brought $1 contributions from students, faculty, alumni and community members. The bells rang out again October 17, 1987 and have continued – from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. – to chime every quarter hour since.

Gunter Hall

Construction began in September 1926 and was competed in 1928. Gunter’s original bell chimes were replaced with a second set in 1948. When the chimes stopped ringing in 1985 due to age and mechanical difficulties, a heartfelt grassroots campaign called “Bucks for Bells” brought $1 contributions from students, faculty, alumni and community members. The bells rang out again October 17, 1987 and have continued – from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. – to chime every quarter hour since.

West campus’s dining hall, Holmes opened on January 8, 2005.

Holmes Dining Hall

West campus’s dining hall, Holmes opened on January 8, 2005. It replaced the dining hall previously housed in Harrison Hall.

Dedicated in November of 1966, Harrison Hall has been the home away from home for thousands of UNC students. Today, it houses more than 500 Bears and UNC's Outdoor Pursuits program.  

Harrison Hall

Dedicated in November of 1966, Harrison Hall has been the home away from home for thousands of UNC students. Today, it houses more than 500 Bears and UNC's Outdoor Pursuits program.  

The cornerstone for what was the Training School was laid in 1910, with additional construction continuing over the years, until 1923. The building – now home to the Kenneth W. Monfort College of Business – was renamed Kepner Hall in 1931.

Kepner Hall

The cornerstone for what was the Training School was laid in 1910, with additional construction continuing over the years, until 1923. The building – now home to the Kenneth W. Monfort College of Business – was renamed Kepner Hall in 1931.

Native American Student Services and Asian/Pacific American Student Services are both located in Kohl House.

Kohl House

Native American Student Services and Asian/Pacific American Student Services are both located in Kohl House. A/PASS serves as the home office for UNC's Hawaii Club which hosts the annual UNC Luau.

The tallest building between Denver, Colorado and Cheyenne, Wyoming, Lawrenson was built in 1973 and stands 17 stories tall.

Lawrenson Hall

The tallest building between Denver, Colorado and Cheyenne, Wyoming, Lawrenson was built in 1973 and stands 17 stories tall.

Completed in 1968 as the home for UNC’s College of Education and Behavioral Sciences. Fifteen of Colorado’s Teacher of the Year honorees graduated from UNC, and 13 of the 15 passed through these doors. Frank Barnard Evans ’52 and William McBride ’57 (Colorado Teachers of the Year for 1964 and 1966 respectively) graduated before McKee Hall was built.

McKee Hall of Education

Completed in 1968 as the home for UNC’s College of Education and Behavioral Sciences. Fifteen of Colorado’s Teacher of the Year honorees graduated from UNC, and 13 of the 15 passed through these doors. Frank Barnard Evans ’52 and William McBride ’57 (Colorado Teachers of the Year for 1964 and 1966 respectively) graduated before McKee Hall was built.

Completed in 1971, the University was renamed James A. Michener Library in 1973. Michener earned his master’s in Education from then-Colorado State Teacher’s College and also taught at the university. The library houses the James A. Michener Collection, which includes 900 linear feet of materials including Michener’s research notes, manuscripts, galley proofs and correspondence, as well as field notebooks, maps, photographs and slides he collected while writing his novels.

James A. Michener Library

Completed in 1971, the University was renamed James A. Michener Library in 1973. Michener earned his master’s in Education from then-Colorado State Teacher’s College and also taught at the university. The library houses the James A. Michener Collection, which includes 900 linear feet of materials including Michener’s research notes, manuscripts, galley proofs and correspondence, as well as field notebooks, maps, photographs and slides he collected while writing his novels.

Nottingham has been home to the Bears since 1996, and for the 2021 football season there will be new turf for the first kickoff, thanks to a donor in partnership with Academy Sports Turf.

Nottingham Field

Nottingham has been home to the Bears since 1996, and for the 2021 football season there will be new turf for the first kickoff, thanks to a donor in partnership with Academy Sports Turf.

These picturesque residence halls built in the 1930s were originally called Faculty Apartments and now house more than 170 students.

President's Row

These picturesque residence halls built in the 1930s were originally called Faculty Apartments and now house more than 170 students.

Completed in 1964 and dedicated in 1965, Ross Hall houses classrooms, labs and faculty offices and is well-known by Biology, Chemistry, Earth Sciences, Physics, Mathematical Sciences, English and History students.

Ross Hall of Science

Completed in 1964 and dedicated in 1965, Ross Hall houses classrooms, labs and faculty offices and is well-known by Biology, Chemistry, Earth Sciences, Physics, Mathematical Sciences, English and History students.

One of six residence halls that makes up the Central Coalition on central campus, Snyder Hall overlooks Snyder Green.

Snyder Hall

One of six residence halls that makes up the Central Coalition on central campus, Snyder Hall overlooks Snyder Green.

Built in 1997 and named Skinner Music Library in 2005, it houses more than 100,000 scores, books, periodicals, and recordings.

Skinner Music Library

Built in 1997 and named Skinner Music Library in 2005, it houses more than 100,000 scores, books, periodicals, and recordings.

Dedicated October 22, 1999, Scott-Wilcoxon Hall houses the Women’s Resource Center and Stryker Institute for Leadership Development. Funded by generous donor Ronda Stryker ’76, the Stryker Program celebrates its 20th anniversary in 2021, with more than 500 Stryker Scholars benefiting from the program – and going on to make a difference in their communities.

Scott-Wilcoxon Hall

Dedicated October 22, 1999, Scott-Wilcoxon Hall houses the Women’s Resource Center and Stryker Institute for Leadership Development. Funded by generous donor Ronda Stryker ’76, the Stryker Program celebrates its 20th anniversary in 2021, with more than 500 Stryker Scholars benefiting from the program – and going on to make a difference in their communities.

Dedicated June 13, 1936, Tobey-Kendel houses the central campus dining hall and meeting spaces.

Tobey-Kendel Hall

Dedicated June 13, 1936, Tobey-Kendel houses the central campus dining hall and meeting spaces.

Built in 1965, originally called “College Center,” the building was renamed the University Center in 1970. It houses the bookstore, Fan Gear, restaurants, meeting spaces, computer commons, the Center for Career Readiness, university clubs and organizations, and Conferences and Event Services.

University Center

Built in 1965, originally called “College Center,” the building was renamed the University Center in 1970. It houses the bookstore, Fan Gear, restaurants, meeting spaces, computer commons, the Center for Career Readiness, university clubs and organizations, and Conferences and Event Services.

Housed in Roudebush Cottage, UNC’s Veteran Services Office supports students who are veterans or military members and their descendants, providing them with a study space and benefits processing, and offering advocacy resources. Originally the cottage housed home economics. 

Veteran Services

Housed in Roudebush Cottage, UNC’s Veteran Services Office supports students who are veterans or military members and their descendants, providing them with a study space and benefits processing, and offering advocacy resources. Originally the cottage housed home economics. 

For additional information about UNC buildings, see the chronology on University Libraries Archives and Special Collection.