Chief's Corner


30 August 2017

UNC Police is making campus aware of an FBI warning of a credit card scheme targeting college bookstores. Crooks posing as students are using stolen credit cards to make purchases and enlisting unwitting students with valid student IDs to vouch for them at the check-out counter. While there are no reports of this activity on UNC's campus, UNC PD advises students to protect themselves by not agreeing to help strangers with purchases. A red flag is the lack of a valid ID. Report suspicious activity to UNC PD at 970-351-2245. Read the full warning on this FBI webpage.

Dennis R. Pumphrey
Chief of Police


 

4 April 2017

Do Your Homework Before Taking an Internship

Opportunities for employment and career experience through paid and unpaid internships are advertised throughout the year on university campuses.  At UNC, recruitment for internships may occur at tables in the University Center and during presentations in classrooms or other locations on campus.

Just because you may have received a presentation or viewed an ad about an internship on campus doesn’t mean the company has a solid history or reputation.  It’s always in your best interest to research a company before accepting an internship.  

Be sure to ask questions about the work required and the experience to be gained from the internship.  Research the company offering the internship, including any information that you can find about the level of satisfaction among students who were interns with the company, before agreeing to an internship.  Some advertised paid internships may pay at or barely above the minimum wage and may not provide the work experience that will augment your education in your desired profession.  Some “internships” aren’t more than an opportunity for businesses to recruit low-cost labor from students.  Other companies may pay a reasonable wage or provide work experience, but may include hidden costs — such as up-front fees, a requirement to pay your own travel costs, or use of your own vehicle while working — that effectively reduce the net wages that you will receive.  Some internships may be unpaid if certain legal requirements are met, but that in itself does not guarantee that the experience you receive will translate to valuable knowledge in your field of study.  A quick internet search on ‘internship warning’ reveals multiple cautionary tales.

Thankfully, UNC’s Career Services has resources that can help you to navigate these issues regarding available internships and opportunities.  You can seek information on a possible internship through Career Services online or schedule a meeting with a Career Services counselor.  You can access the Career Services website at: http://www.unco.edu/careers/index.html

Thank you,

Dennis R. Pumphrey
Chief of Police


2 November 2016

The General Election is rapidly approaching on Tuesday, November 8th.   I would like to take this time to remind you of specific rules and laws that must be adhered to in order to uphold the integrity of the election process.

It is a criminal offense to attempt to influence someone’s vote by offering cash or other compensation to the voter.  This includes attempting to influence the vote for a specific candidate or issue, or to compensate an individual for failing to vote.

On Election Day, or at any time in an active polling place (such as early voting), voters may not wear pins, t-shirts, hats, or other apparel that displays a preference for a candidate, political party, or ballot question.  Electioneering (or campaigning) is not allowed within 100 feet of each polling place.

Colorado law prohibits state employees from using university resources to endorse or oppose an issue or candidate.  State employees may not campaign while on the job, take a position on behalf of the university or any part of it, or use the university’s infrastructure including phone, fax and e-mail to express political views.

Employees may campaign on their own time and expense.

Additional information can be found on the Colorado Secretary of State website at:http://www.sos.state.co.us

Thank you,

Dennis R. Pumphrey
Chief of Police