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Schulze Speaker Series 2019-2020

Spring 2020

"With Liberty and Justice for All" Critical Contemplative Approaches For Advancing Youth Justice

Dr. Michelle Chatman, Assistant Professor in the Crime, Justice, and Security Studies program at the University of the District of Columbia, Washington, D.C.
  • Friday, February 28, 2020
  • Presentation: 7:00 - 8:30 p.m. 
  • University Center, Columbine A, 2101 10th Avenue, Greeley, CO 80631

 Dr. Michelle Chatman


 Dr. John Calvert, Professor of History, Creighton University, Omaha, Nebraska

Sayyid Qutb: The Greeley Connection

  • Thursday, March 26, 2020
  • Presentation: 6:30 p.m.
  • University Center, Columbine A

 Dr. Carol Cleland, Professor of Philosophy, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado

Searching for Extra-terrestrial Life: Will we recognize it if we find it?

  • Friday, April 17, 2020
  • Reception: 5:30 - 6:30 p.m. University Center, Campus Commons Lobby
  • Presentation: 6:30 - 7:30 p.m. University Center, Campus Commons Multipurpose Hall

"With Liberty and Justice for All"

Critical Contemplative Approaches for Advancing Youth Justice

Dr. Michelle Chatman is Assistant Professor in the Crime, Justice, and Security Studies program at the University of the District of Columbia.  Her work focuses on the use of contemplative approaches to support liberated learning environments that center healing, social justice, and community. 

  • Friday, February 28, 2020
  • University of Northern Colorado, University Center, Columbine A
    2101 10th Ave, Greeley, CO 80631 
  • Public Talk: 7:00 - 8:30 p.m. 
  • FREE Public Talk on Saturday, February 29 at University Center
  • RSVP here to Satruday's event : rockymountaindialogues.eventbrite.com

 Thousands of students repeat the Pledge of Allegiance daily, yet its ideals remain elusive.  The unhealed wounds of history continue to manifest in harsh school disciplinary practices and discriminatory policies that harm students in schools.  Youth of color (Black, Latinx, and Native American} continue to be overrepresented in almost every spectrum of the juvenile justice system.  Implicit racial and gender bias within and beyond the classroom increases youths' vulnerability to justice system involvement.  Denver's embrace of the restorative justice movement is showing promise for stopping the school-to-prison pipeline and, beyond that, is providing a healthier model for how we can live in community together.  To help mitigate continued racial and ethnic disparities in the criminal and juvenile justice system, I propose the broad adoption of critical contemplative approaches which may invite our "deeper seeing."  Coupled with the creation of policies and practices rooted in equity, justice, and love, we can all become stronger advocates for advancing youth justice.

 Dr. Michelle Chatman, University of the District of Columbia