Superior Training, Outstanding Job Opportunities

The Rehabilitation Counseling master’s program at the University of Northern Colorado is one of the top programs of its kind in the United States. Accredited by the Council on Rehabilitation Education (CORE), the 60-credit-hour degree program is known for its exceptional classroom teachers who are also recognized experts and seasoned researchers in the field of Rehabilitation Counseling. In recognition of our program’s quality, the U.S. Department of Education recently awarded UNC a five-year, $938,705 federal grant to train rehabilitation counselors at the master’s level.

As a student in this master’s program, you'll take part in a supervised practicum in our Rehabilitation Counseling Clinic, where you'll get actual experience counseling clients under observation and supervision. In addition, you will complete 600 clock hours of internship, including 240 hours in direct service to people with disabilities. Rehabilitation counselors make a real difference in the lives of people with disabilities, and UNC graduates stand out in the field. In recent years, 93 percent of our graduates have passed the Certified Rehabilitation Counselor (CRC) exam, and 100 percent have found employment in their field.

Degree Details

Credits Required:




Time to Completion:

2.5 Years

Cost Estimator

Degree Option

M.A. in Rehabilitation Counseling

Our Rehabilitation Counseling M.A. is designed to meet the needs of working professionals. About half of the required courses are completed online, with the other half offered on campus in the late afternoon and evening. On-campus courses are presented in three-hour blocks, so students need only come to campus once a week. Elective courses can be taken either online or on-campus. Typically, the program can be completed in two academic years, including one summer.

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“The internship experience is vital and invaluable for success as a new Rehabilitation Counselor. I still refer back to my internship experience as I have grown in this profession. The structure of the classes and the relationships with the professors also promote success. I like that I'm really making a difference and I can see the positive outcomes.”

Kelly Dieter, Rehabilitation Counseling, 2012

Your Future in Rehabilitation Counseling

Rehabilitation Counseling is a rapidly growing field that offers those with the right training and education excellent career potential. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, jobs in this field are expected to grow by 20 percent in the next decade. Graduates of the well-respected UNC Rehabilitation Counseling program are avidly recruited both regionally and nationally.

Consider UNC’s M.A. in Rehabilitation Counseling if you want to:

  • Work as a certified rehabilitation counselor
  • Help people with disabilities
  • Gain extensive hands-on experience as part of your training
  • Learn from nationally respected leaders in rehabilitation education 

You’ll learn:

  • Social, cultural, psychological and medical aspects of disabilities
  • Vocational assessment and job placement services to people with disabilities
  • Rehabilitation counseling theories and techniques
  • Ways to improve the quality of life for people with disabilities
  • How to evaluate research in the field of rehabilitation counseling and related areas

Sample courses:

  • Rehabilitation Principles and Case Management
  • Vocational Evaluation and Assessment of People with Disabilities
  • Occupational Information and Job Placement
  • Medical Aspects of Disability
Megan Babkes Stellino


Jill Bezyak, Ph.D.

Jill Bezyak, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor of Human Rehabilitative Services at the University of Northern Colorado. She received her doctorate and master’s degrees in Rehabilitation Psychology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She teaches undergraduate courses in human services and graduate courses in rehabilitation counseling. Bezyak is a Certified Rehabilitation Counselor and Licensed Psychologist with a wide array of clinical interests including psychiatric rehabilitation, substance abuse counseling, and counseling of individuals with physical disabilities and chronic illness. Her research interests include health promotion of individuals with disabilities, implementation of the Americans with Disabilities Act, and knowledge translation in rehabilitation counseling. In addition to these specific interests, she enjoys working with students to develop their clinical and/or research interests.

Beyond the Classroom

Practical, hands-on experience is at the core of the UNC Rehabilitation Counseling master’s program. It starts with your on-campus practicum at the UNC Rehabilitation Counseling Clinic, where you’ll work with actual clients and meet afterward with your classmates and the professor to discuss the session. You will also complete a 600-clock-hour internship working alongside professional rehabilitation counselors in the field. Our students have interned at the Colorado Division of Vocational Rehabilitation offices throughout Colorado and other public agencies, as well as at mental health facilities and private non-profit and for-profit organizations.

Where can your degree take you?

  • State rehabilitation agencies
  • Programs that work with individuals who are blind and visually impaired
  • Mental health agencies
  • Programs serving veterans
  • Worker’s compensation programs
  • Private non-profit rehabilitation agencies
  • Independent living centers

Current Research

UNC’s Rehabilitation Counseling professors have a long history of engaging with students in groundbreaking research. The following study is a case in point.

Improving Nutrition and Physical Activity Among Individuals with Mental Illness

Jill Bezyak, Ph.D. (Rehabilitation Counseling)

Dr. Bezyak, her colleague, Dr. Clark, and their team of graduate and undergraduate students undertook an intervention program for clients of North Range Behavioral Health in Greeley, Colorado, to address physical activity and nutritional education needs. She and her team worked specifically with clients at the Frontier House, which is a program within North Range Behavioral Health that serves adults with severe and persistent mental illness. The intervention program was created based on feedback from clients, and the intervention was designed to specifically meet the needs of the target population. The team incorporated motivational interviewing as a tool to enhance behavior change in the areas of physical activity and healthy eating. Following the intervention program, participants reported increased calcium, Vitamin D, fruit, and grain consumption, along with improved cooking and grocery shopping skills.


What You Need to Know Right Now