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Bill Wiltrack
Apprentice

20 Posts

Posted - Aug 11 2007 :  04:55:17 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
WHO AM I?



The most important intellectual question a philosopher can ask of themselves.




Yet, intellectually you cannot correctly answer the question.



.

non
Journeyman

72 Posts

Posted - Aug 11 2007 :  6:23:19 PM  Show Profile  Send non an AOL message  Reply with Quote
intellectually..... as opposed to what exactly?
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Bill Wiltrack
Apprentice

20 Posts

Posted - Aug 15 2007 :  06:48:50 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
One of the functions of a human being is our intellectual function. Intellectual function works in opposites, for example, your reply to my post, “Intellectually…as opposed to what exactly?” The intellect is one way, as people, we are able to understand our reality.

The intellect is one aspect of a human being that helps us define things in a certain way. Our bodies, our emotions, our state of being are also a part of us as human beings.

Being able to be self conscious enough to be able to intellectually ask and respond to the question “Who am I?” makes us God-like.

Being able to be self conscious enough to be able to see beyond our individual intellect makes us even more God-like. At each moment we are much more than our intellect.
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non
Journeyman

72 Posts

Posted - Aug 20 2007 :  11:35:15 PM  Show Profile  Send non an AOL message  Reply with Quote
So:
Defining ourselves through opposites is the most important intellectual task for a philosopher to undertake?
Even though it can't be done?

Any reason that's true?

Isn't anything that can deal with opposites forced to deal with itself through that lens?
(I'm asking: what all goes in the catagory "us" here?)

And how is self consciousness seperate from intellect? Isn't it just seperating Me from Not-Me?
Clearly if there is anything about Me that is more than my awareness of myself and what is not myself, something more than my awareness of opposites, there's going to be more to me than intellect, but why is it that the intellect can't complete the task?

Why is it impossible?

And still, the most important?
The first. Perhaps.
But how is any question more importnat than another?
What does importance mean here?

I'm genuinely interested here. So a point by point responce would be amazing.
I feel like we agree in certain ways. I've been thinking alot about the cry, "WHY ME"
And it's very, very closely related to WHO AM I?
Though not identical.
I'm not sure I would call WHY ME the most important question.
I'm not entirely sure I want to call it a question.
But. I do feel it is central to what it is to be alive.
To live a life.
To be born and face death.
So WHO AM I? is central too, becvause it is so closely tied to WHY ME.

Is one more important than the other?

And I suppose my last question is: What do you mean by God-like; or is God-like just another way of saying self conscious?

Hasta.
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Bill Wiltrack
Apprentice

20 Posts

Posted - Aug 21 2007 :  3:31:38 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
“WHO AM I?” is central to philosophical thought. Not only is this an important question in western philosophical ontology, but is central to all non-theistic ('Enlightenment') religions.

Even though the question “Who Am I?” cannot be answered intellectually, defining ourselves through opposites is the most important intellectual task for a philosopher to undertake. Anything that can deal with opposites is forced to deal with itself through that lens.

Clearly if there is anything about me that is more than my awareness of myself something more than my awareness of opposites, there's going to be more to me than intellect.

The intellectual function is one of the functions of a human being. Instinctive function; the automatic body functions, physical function; learned physical behavior, emotional, and intellectual function are the other functions we enjoy as being human. Some could argue there exists a higher intellectual and higher emotional function.

The intellectual function may be the most important function for a philosopher for the intellectual function is the slowest of functions in the human makeup. Intellectual function could be the crack in the cosmic egg that allows mature individuals, if they choose, to ask, “Who am I?” The intellectual function allows us to direct our attention towards our self, to be more aware of our self to be more self-conscious. Intellectual function works in opposites, for example, your reply to my post, “Intellectually…as opposed to what exactly?” The intellect is one way, as people, we are able to understand our reality.

The intellect is one aspect of a human being that helps us define things in a certain way. Our bodies, our emotions, our state of being are also a part of us as human beings.

There are degrees to self-consciousness. To many philosophers and psychologists higher degrees of self-consciousness represent freedom or characterize what could be considered a philosophical thought process.

To some of us a higher degree of freedom from attachment to self could be considered God-like. Being able to be self conscious enough to be able to intellectually ask and respond to the question “Who am I?” makes us God-like.

God-like is just another way of saying self conscious.

Being able to be self conscious enough to be able to see beyond our individual intellect makes us even more God-like. At each moment we are much more than our intellect.

Intellectual function can help a philosopher ask and look for the answer to the question “Who Am I?” If you are unable to see beyond your own individual intellectual stream of thoughts you are unable to truly answer the question “Who Am I?” Defining ourselves through opposites is the most important intellectual task for a philosopher to undertake even though the intellectual function cannot answer the question.

I am in awe of the whole philosophical thought process. Philosophical writings lead to a place beyond the linear brain, take us beyond our normal everyday consciousness. Philosophical writings and philosophical thought can beckon you enter a place of wordless observation. Indeed, philosophy can be described as looking at a common occurrence in an uncommon way. Sometimes you return from your philosophical journey to jot down your thoughts and observations, occasionally post on The Philosophy Forums of the University of Colorado.

On a daily basis, the unconventional philosophical viewpoints that we develop adds richness and depth to each passing second of our lives.

Being able to see through your self, beyond your thoughts, to me, that is a philosophical life. A philosophical life is a life that is complete in itself and need not hold any promises of outer fortune. Although each moment seems to pass, inside there is a collectiveness that is not lost. A collectiveness those purpose is to increase understanding, and as philosophers; to increase self.

In the end, philosophical thought urges us to enter the fragile, quiet moments of acceptance and understandings, reluctantly leaving the convoluted limited, linear Babel of left brain ego, where we have to defend, confront and outwardly prove the ramblings of a straw man.




Inner conflict is expressed outwardly, observable as a defense for the ego, a separation, a lie of reality.
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