UNC Institute Joins ‘LaCROSSe Out Cancer Night’

Preliminary findings from cognitive tests before and after using the "brain" bike show promise for reducing negative effects of the chemo treatments.

Photo courtesy of RMCRI

A "brain" bike being used at UNC's Rocky Mountain Cancer Rehabilitation Institute shows promise in alleviating side effects experienced by cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. Such cutting-edge practices have attracted attention - most recently by the Colorado Mammoth, which will donate 50 percent of ticket sales from its game on "LaCROSSe Out Cancer Night" March 8.

Only tickets purchased through www.mammothtix.com/RMCRI are eligible for the donation. The Mammoth host the Calgary Roughnecks at 7 p.m. at the Pepsi Center in Denver.

The institute's recumbent, computer-connected bike combines physical activity with cognitive exercises. Following a chemotherapy treatment, patients ride the bike while using a mouse hooked up to a computer to complete memory-recall tasks.

Preliminary findings from cognitive tests before and after the three-month program show promise for reducing negative effects of the chemo treatments.

Outside organizations, like the Mammoth, are taking notice of the institute. RMCRI has received more than $2 million in grant funding from a number of agencies, including the American Cancer Society, the Komen Foundation, the National Institutes of Health and the Department of Health and Human Services.

Ticket Info

University of Northern Colorado's Rocky Mountain Cancer Rehabilitation Institute has teamed up with the Colorado Mammoth for the professional team's "LaCROSSe Out Cancer Night." For every ticket sold to the March 8 game through the website, www.mammothtix.com/RMCRI, the institute will receive 50 percent of the sale. Only tickets purchased at that website are eligible for the donation.

About RMCRI

The Rocky Mountain Cancer Rehabilitation Institute is recognized as the leader in the field of cancer rehabilitation. The Institute continues to provide individualized rehabilitative services for cancer survivors in the Northern Colorado region, conduct cutting-edge research to understand why and how exercise and nutritional interventions may alleviate treatment-related side effects, and educate those individuals providing cancer rehabilitation services to survivors.

The Rocky Mountain Cancer Rehabilitation Institute has:

  • Provided clinical services to over 1,300 adult survivors
  • Provided cancer rehabilitation services to approximately 150 cancer survivors per year from northern Colorado and surrounding areas
  • Published over 75 original, peer-reviewed research articles in some of our field's most prestigious journals
  • Published two textbooks on cancer rehabilitation
  • Given over 200 presentations at national, regional and local meetings
  • Received over $2 million in grant funding from multiple agencies including the American Cancer Society, the Komen Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, and the Department of Health and Human Services
  • Established research collaborations with leading cancer institutions such as MD Anderson Cancer Center and the University of Colorado Cancer Center
  • Trained more than 675 undergraduate and 215 Masters and Doctoral graduate students as Cancer Exercise Specialists
  • Supervised more than 170 undergraduate interns in cancer rehabilitation
  • Trained over 100 healthcare professionals in cancer rehabilitation