UNC Today: Friday, October 26, 2012

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'Chasing Ice'

UNC graduate student Adam LeWinter was dispatched to the Arctic as part of the team that produced the 2012 Sundance Film Festival Award-winning documentary Chasing Ice. Crews placed time-lapse cameras throughout the region to track multiyear changes in glaciers. Continue Reading

UNC Awarded More than $650,000 in National Grants

Multiyear national grants recently awarded to University of Northern Colorado faculty researchers total more than $650,000 combined.

Funding for the three separate projects will support: researching factors in recruiting and retaining women in geosciences degree programs to help increase the number of women graduating; acquiring geophysics instruments to conduct research and training and provide educational opportunities in the fields of Archaeology, Earth Science, Biology and Physics; and providing an overseas seminar to study the history and philosophy of peaceful revolutions that led to the fall of communism in Eastern Europe more than 20 years ago.

An overview of each award:

NFS logoNational Science Foundation

Project Title: "Collaborative Research: Recruitment and Retention of Women in Geosciences: An Investigation of Individual and Environmental Factors"
Funding amount: $431,555 (Aug. 15, 2012-July 31, 2015)
Funding agency: National Science Foundation (Research on Gender in Science and Engineering, NSF 10-516)
Principal Investigator: Julie Sexton, Mathematics and Science Teaching Institute, and co-principal investigator Kevin Pugh, Educational Psychology, in collaboration with Purdue University.
From the Project Summary: To fill a gap in research, the group will study the characteristics of university geoscience programs with above-average and below-average graduation of women in the programs. The goal is to help contribute to the knowledge needed to increase the proportion of women earning undergraduate geoscience degrees from U.S. universities.
More info: http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward.do?AwardNumber=1136233

Project Title: Acquisition of a system of geophysics instruments for archaeological geophysics research and training"
Funding Amount: $110,321 (August 15, 2012-July 31, 2015)
Funding Agency: National Science Foundation (Major Research Instrumentation)
Principal Investigator: Andrew Creekmore, Anthropology; with other UNC faculty:Robert Brunswig (emeritus), Steve Mackessy (Biological Sciences), Cynthia Galovich (Physics) and Byron Straw (Earth Sciences).
From the Project Summary: These instruments include a magnetometer, resistivity meter, conductivity meter, ground-penetrating radar, and sensor attachment for an existing magnetic susceptibility meter. Each of these measures different properties of the Earth and form an integrated research system for state-of-the-art applications. The instruments will support the following new and ongoing research: studies of Colorado prehistoric and historic Native American populations; trading forts of the 1800s along the Colorado Front Range; the African-American settlement of Dearfield; rattlesnake hibernation dens; climate history and change through the study of rock glaciers and moraines; and development of a grant-funded archaeological and geophysics test site. The funding also will support opportunities for students to be involved through research and training.
More info: http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward.do?AwardNumber=1229061
Of note: UNC's Jeremy Smith was awarded a NSF Major Research Instrumentation Grant a year ago: http://www.unco.edu/news/releases.aspx?id=3156

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Project Title: "East-Central Europe, 1989: The History and Philosophy of the Peaceful Revolutions"
Funding Amount: $109,084 (Oct. 1, 2012-September 30, 2013)
Funding Agency: National Endowment for the Humanities (Seminars for School Teachers Program)
Principal Investigator: Christiane Olivo, Political Science & International Affairs
From the Project Summary: The grant will support a four-week seminar, modeled after Olivo's 2009 seminar, in Berlin, Germany; and Prague, Czech Republic, where three questions about the fall of communism more than 20 years ago will be examined: 1) What role did democratic opposition play in the fall of communism? 2) What were philosophical ideas developed by dissidents in the civil societies of these communist countries? And, what is the ongoing specific significance of these political philosophies?
Disclaimer: Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this article do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities

UNC Awarded More than $650,000 in National Grants

Multiyear national grants recently awarded to University of Northern Colorado faculty researchers total more than $650,000 combined.

Funding for the three separate projects will support: researching factors in recruiting and retaining women in geosciences degree programs to help increase the number of women graduating; acquiring geophysics instruments to conduct research and training and provide educational opportunities in the fields of Archaeology, Earth Science, Biology and Physics; and providing an overseas seminar to study the history and philosophy of peaceful revolutions that led to the fall of communism in Eastern Europe more than 20 years ago.

An overview of each award:

NFS logoNational Science Foundation

Project Title: "Collaborative Research: Recruitment and Retention of Women in Geosciences: An Investigation of Individual and Environmental Factors"
Funding amount: $431,555 (Aug. 15, 2012-July 31, 2015)
Funding agency: National Science Foundation (Research on Gender in Science and Engineering, NSF 10-516)
Principal Investigator: Julie Sexton, Mathematics and Science Teaching Institute, and co-principal investigator Kevin Pugh, Educational Psychology, in collaboration with Purdue University.
From the Project Summary: To fill a gap in research, the group will study the characteristics of university geoscience programs with above-average and below-average graduation of women in the programs. The goal is to help contribute to the knowledge needed to increase the proportion of women earning undergraduate geoscience degrees from U.S. universities.
More info: http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward.do?AwardNumber=1136233

Project Title: Acquisition of a system of geophysics instruments for archaeological geophysics research and training"
Funding Amount: $110,321 (August 15, 2012-July 31, 2015)
Funding Agency: National Science Foundation (Major Research Instrumentation)
Principal Investigator: Andrew Creekmore, Anthropology; with other UNC faculty:Robert Brunswig (emeritus), Steve Mackessy (Biological Sciences), Cynthia Galovich (Physics) and Byron Straw (Earth Sciences).
From the Project Summary: These instruments include a magnetometer, resistivity meter, conductivity meter, ground-penetrating radar, and sensor attachment for an existing magnetic susceptibility meter. Each of these measures different properties of the Earth and form an integrated research system for state-of-the-art applications. The instruments will support the following new and ongoing research: studies of Colorado prehistoric and historic Native American populations; trading forts of the 1800s along the Colorado Front Range; the African-American settlement of Dearfield; rattlesnake hibernation dens; climate history and change through the study of rock glaciers and moraines; and development of a grant-funded archaeological and geophysics test site. The funding also will support opportunities for students to be involved through research and training.
More info: http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward.do?AwardNumber=1229061
Of note: UNC's Jeremy Smith was awarded a NSF Major Research Instrumentation Grant a year ago: http://www.unco.edu/news/releases.aspx?id=3156

logo

Project Title: "East-Central Europe, 1989: The History and Philosophy of the Peaceful Revolutions"
Funding Amount: $109,084 (Oct. 1, 2012-September 30, 2013)
Funding Agency: National Endowment for the Humanities (Seminars for School Teachers Program)
Principal Investigator: Christiane Olivo, Political Science & International Affairs
From the Project Summary: The grant will support a four-week seminar, modeled after Olivo's 2009 seminar, in Berlin, Germany; and Prague, Czech Republic, where three questions about the fall of communism more than 20 years ago will be examined: 1) What role did democratic opposition play in the fall of communism? 2) What were philosophical ideas developed by dissidents in the civil societies of these communist countries? And, what is the ongoing specific significance of these political philosophies?
Disclaimer: Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this article do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities

Director of ‘Gasland’ Anchors Speaker Series at UNC Nov. 13-15

A presentation by the maker of an Academy Award-nominated documentary film about the use of hydraulic fracturing to drill for natural gas will anchor three events this week that are part of a popular interdisciplinary speaker series at the University of Northern Colorado.

Filmmaker Josh Fox will discuss hydraulic fracturing, commonly referred to as fracking, in the Colorado, beginning at 7 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 15, in the University Center ballrooms, intersection of 10th Avenue and 20th Street.

Fox chronicled the cross-country trip he took to understand the concerns posed by the controversial drilling process in Gasland, which was nominated for a 2011 Academy Award in the Documentary Feature category.

The presentation is free and open to the public, but free tickets must be obtained through the UNC Ticket Office by calling 351-4849 or stopping by the information desk in the UC.

Fox's appearance is the final event in a trifecta of events that are part of UNC's Schulze Interdisciplinary Speaker Series. The other events include:

  • The Mont Alto Motion Picture Orchestra will perform a live musical score to the 1927 silent film Chicago beginning at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 14, in Milne Auditorium (room 2050) in Kepner Hall, intersection of 8th Avenue and 17th Street. The event is free and open to the public. More information
  • A presentation by University of Georgia Professor Lorilee Sandmann on the importance of community-engaged scholarship, especially in times of shifting economic and social landscapes. "Cracks in the Ivory Tower" from 7-9 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 13, in the University Center's Panorama room, also is free and open to the public. More information

Free parking is available in university parking lots after 5 p.m.

The series is sponsored by UNC's Schulze Fund for Interdisciplinary Studies and the Life of the Mind Program.

UNC Choirs, Symphony Orchestra Next Up for UNC Concert Series

The University of Northern Colorado School of Music's top jazz groups, choirs, bands and orchestras perform world-class music in a world-class setting during the UNC@UCCC Music Series at Greeley's Union Colony Civic Center, 701 10th Ave. The series' fall/winter schedule continues Tuesday, Oct. 30, with a performance by University Choirs at 7:30 p.m., followed by the University Symphony Orchestra on Thursday, Nov. 1, at 7:30 p.m.

The rest of the series' schedule is:

Fall 2012

  • Nov. 8: Vocal Jazz, 7:30 p.m.
  • Nov. 13: University Bands, 7 p.m.
  • Dec. 2: University Choirs Holiday Concert, 7:30 p.m.

Spring 2013

  • Feb. 4: University Symphony Orchestra, 7:30 p.m.
  • Feb. 19: University Bands, 7 p.m.
  • Feb. 26: University Choirs, 7:30 p.m.
  • Feb. 27: Jazz Lab Bands, 7:30 p.m.
  • April 1: University Symphony Orchestra, 7:30 p.m.
  • April 2: Vocal Jazz, 7:30 p.m.

All concerts are at in the Monfort Concert Hall at the UCCC in downtown Greeley.

Single performance tickets are $10 for adults and $7 for students. Tickets are available in person at the UCCC and Performing Arts Box Office, over the phone at 351-2200 or online at www.ucstars.com.

USPS Box Relocated at University Center

Due to the construction on the upper-level entrance of the University Center, the U.S. Postal Service box that was located there has been relocated to the lower-level entrance area outside near Subway and Bear Logic.

Webinar to Address Creating a Gender-Inclusive Campus

The Higher Education and Student Affairs Leadership Student Organization and the GLBTA Resource Office will host a webinar titled "Creating a Gender Inclusive Campus" at 11 a.m. Monday, Oct. 29, the Columbine B room in the University Center.

Although trans and gender-nonconforming people have become more visible on college campuses and in the media and popular culture over the last decade, many cisgender (non-transgender) student affairs professionals lack even a basic understanding of the lives of trans individuals and how to meet their needs through creating a more gender-inclusive campus.

This webinar will discuss the complex ways that students understand and express their gender today and the best practices and policies to support trans and gender-nonconforming students. Areas covered will include housing, facilities, health services, student activities, athletics, and admissions. A particular emphasis will be placed on how trans identities intersect with other aspects of student identities.

Please email Katee Keen with questions

Classified Position Opportunity

Accounting Tech II - Parking Services. Requires two years experience. Apply by Nov. 2 online or in person at Human Resources in Carter Hall.

Defenses of Dissertations and Oral Comp Exams

The following defenses of dissertations and oral comprehensive examinations are scheduled: Continue Reading

Today's Events

This Weekend’s and Next Week’s Events (link to online calendar)