Archived Webinars

As of September 2016, the MARIE Center's website is no longer maintained.

 

These webinars are available for viewing.

The MARIE Center no longer provides CEUs for them.

Critiquing and deconstructing metaphors: A normative ethical framework for community interpreters:

Date originally aired: September 12, 2016
Presenters: Robyn Dean, CI/CT, PhD
Description: In 2000, Pym proposed that translators and interpreters adopt an approach of cooperation. In other words, practitioners should seek to enhance (or at least not prevent) the cooperation between interlocutors of other languages/cultures.
Moreover, this proposition is in alignment with ideals from morality scholarship: Cooperation is the highest form of ethical reasoning. In community interpreting, this ideal is arguably evident in the frequently used metaphor of member of the team. This paper distills the “interpreter-as-team member” metaphor into a series of professional values to propose a framework that aligns with a cooperation-based, ethical framework for interpreters working in community settings.

Target Audience: Working interpreters other interested stakeholders

CEUs: PS 0.15

Resource Links 
PowerPoint Slides
Session Recording (ASL)
Session Recording
Session Transcript

 

Returning to ethics: A meta-ethical analysis of community interpreters’ codes and standards of practice:

Date originally aired: August 29, 2016
Presenters: Robyn Dean, CI/CT, PhD
Description: In 2001, Pym made an appeal for the field to return to ethics. In response, this paper problematizes the ethical framework offered to community interpreters. Metaphors (e.g., conduit/advocate) are often employed to describe practitioners’ behaviors and have since emerged in pedagogy and training materials as an ethical device (e.g. interpretersshould or should not be a conduit). However, devices used to describe behaviors are not the same as those used to propose or evaluate behaviors. Normative ethics dictates the use of terms that evaluate the consequences of practice decisions in light of a profession’s values. As such, an alternative framework is proposed.

Target Audience: Working interpreters other interested stakeholders

CEUs: PS 0.15

Resource Links 
PowerPoint Slides
Session Recording (ASL)
Session Recording
Session Transcript

 

Identifying hearing ASL – English Interpreter’s current practice in determining the need of Deaf Interpreters for court proceedings:

Date originally aired: August 3, 2016
Presenters: Christopher Tester, MsC, CDI, SC:L
Description: This webinar will be a presentation of Christopher Tester's MA Thesis, titled: How American Sign Language-English Interpreters Who Can Hear Determine Need for a Deaf Interpreter for Court Proceedings. This study investigated how and when hearing interpreters in the United States decide there is a need for a Deaf interpreter for court proceedings. Previous publications have strongly suggested that it is best practice to work with a Deaf interpreter for specific situations (NCIEC, 2007). The author utilized two frameworks: Brennan & Brown's (1997) Equality before the Law, and Mathers' (2009) Deaf interpreters in court: an accommodation that is more than reasonable to design a study that will bring to light the criteria used by hearing ASL-English interpreters to determine when a Deaf interpreter should be utilized. This research also explored the hearing interpreter's view of the Deaf interpreter and allowed for discussion of experience of working as the hearing member of a Deaf-hearing team in the courtroom.

 

Target Audience: Interpreters working within legal system and other interested stakeholders

CEUs: PS 0.15

Resource Links 
PowerPoint Slides
Session Recording
Session Transcript - Due to tech issues, the webinar was re-recorded. This transcript is from the live webinar and contains the same information as the recording that is uploaded here plus the question and answer time from the live webinar.


Designing Effective Online Educational Programs

Date originally aired: June 13, 2016
Presenters: Facilitator: Mary Darragh MacLean, Panel: Doug Bowen Bailey, Carolyn Ball, & Lisa Bolding
Description: When the RID Certification Maintenance Program was first launched in 1985 the only distance learning was attending conferences or conventions.  Today more than nearly ½ of all RID approved training takes place online.  However, how do we know this is effective education or not.  This webinar will focus on the current state of online education as supported through RID Approved Sponsors.  Participants will have the benefit to listen to a panel experienced in produce successful online educational programming for interpreters.

Target Audience: Program administrators for approved RID sponsors, interpreter educators, workshop presenters and interested stakeholders.

CEUs: PS 0.15

Resource Links 
PowerPoint Slides
Session Recording
Session Transcript

 

Successful Educational Programs: Well-written learning objectives tied to achievement measured through effective evaluation

Date originally aired: May 23, 2016
Presenters: Facilitator: Richard Laurion, Panel: Carol Tipton, Holly Nelson
Description: One of the most challenging tasks for workshop presenters, instructors of continuing education and credit classes and CMP administrators is ascertaining that learning objectives are valid and robust. Then taking a critical or evaluative look at whether the programming provided achieved the desired learning objectives. During this webinar we will first explore what learning objectives are, what they must include and how to create them. We will also distinguish learning objectives from instructor objectives, a common source of confusion for presenters and administrators.

The second portion of our program will consider how we measure our success.  How do we build evaluation tools that link with the learning objectives and help us identify what was successful or what might need to be tweaked in the future.  Examining both ends of an educational programming will allow us to better determine if there was a successful transfer of knowledge to participants. 

Target Audience: Program administrators for approved RID sponsors, interpreter educators, workshop presenters and interested stakeholders.

CEUs: PS 0.15

Resource Links 
PowerPoint Slides
Session Recording
Session Transcript
PDC Handout


Demystifying Professional versus General Studies, when specialization is becoming ever more Important

Date originally aired: April 25, 2016
Presenters: PDC Team Members: Richard Laurion, Nathan Fowler, Mary Darragh MacLean
Description: The RID Certification Maintenance (CMP) and Associate Continuing Education Tracking (ACET) Programs were developed with flexibility in mind.  When these programs were developed, it was recognized that RID was a young organization and the field and science of interpreting was still developing.  The authors for the CMP/ACET programs wanted to include a way for interpreters to demonstrate their currency in the field (as part of any credential maintenance program) and that might still allow for new and innovative information to be brought into the field.  Creating a General Studies area allowed RID members to explore information that did not have an immediate relevance to interpreting.  It also provided a mechanism for interpreters to explore studies of topics they may seek to interpret in the future, thereby building a solid base of background and understanding for the topic.  This webinar will explore the distinctions between RID’s Professional Studies category and that of General Studies.  We will seek to help participants know how to better advise certified interpreters in documenting their educational endeavors and in making connections between what is or is not a Professional Studies pursuit

Target Audience: Program administrators for approved RID sponsors, interpreter educators, workshop presenters and interested stakeholders.

CEUs: PS 0.15

Resource Links 
PowerPoint Slides
Session Recording
Session Transcript
PDC Handout
Resources and Citations

 

Black Narratives & Culturally Competent Services

Date originally aired: April 11, 2016
Presenter: Erica West Oyedele
Description: (This recording does not include the first few minutes of the webinar, however the missing information can be found in the transcript below) This webinar will present participants with several real life scenarios that were shared by Black interpreters in the 2015 master’s thesis by Erica West Oyedele, Persistence of African-American/Black Signed Language Interpreters in the United States: The importance of Culture and Capital. Participants will be given an opportunity to discuss how these experiences impact relationships between Black interpreters, interpreters of color and their White counterparts in the spheres of education and the workplace. Participants will review a model of cultural competence and devise strategies for applying culturally competent care. Anyone interested in dismantling systems of oppression, increasing the number of interpreters of color, and working towards social justice within the field of interpreting and interpreter education is encouraged to attend this webinar.
Target Audience: All interpreters and interested stakeholders

CEUs: PS 0.15

Resource Links 
PowerPoint Slides
Session Recording
Session Transcript.
Scenarios

 

Power & Privilege: Deaf and Hearing Interpreters' Experiences

Date originally aired: February 29, 2016
Presenters: Risa Shaw & Debra Russell
Description: (This recording does not include the first 10 minutes of the webinar, however the missing information can be found in the transcript below) How do Deaf and hearing interpreters talk about power and privilege when they reflect on their work? This presentation discusses the experiences of interpreters from Canada and the U.S. and their views on constructs of power and privilege dynamics in interpreted interactions. The data we will share showed intersections among power and privilege, interpreters' sense of agency, interpreters' conceptualization of the task of interpreting, negative power dynamics among Deaf and hearing teams, and the need for specialized training about these concepts and how to work together effectively as D/H teams.
Target Audience: Interpreters interested in legal interpreting
Series: CMP

CEUs: PS 0.15

Resource Links 
PowerPoint Slides
Session Recording
Session Transcript

 

Skills Development for VR Interpreters:  Models and Resources

Date originally aired: December 8, 2014
Presenter: Anna Witter-Merithew
Description: The focus of this webinar is on strategies and resources for developing interpreting skills for working in the VR setting.  Practical ideas for how to work independently and/or in small group to enhance skill performance will be discussed.  As well, sources for accessing skill development resources will be identified. 
Target Audience: All interpreters and interested stakeholders
Series: Interpreting in VR Settings 2014 Webinar Series

CEUs: GS 0.15

Resource Links 
PowerPoint Slides
Session Recording
Session Transcript.
Content Mapping
Feedback A Conversation About the Work
The Meaning of Texts
Questions not answered during the webinar

 

What's in a Name?

Date originally aired: December 4, 2014
Presenter: Anna Witter-Merithew
Description: This 90 minute webinar addressed the various perspectives on what it means to be an interpreter in today’s society.  The presentation addressed four essential perspectives—the metaphorical perspective on interpreting, the theoretical perspective on interpreting, the experiential perspective of consumers and the experiential perspective of practitioners.  Each of these perspectives was considered from a historical vantage point and the implications of our identity and practice as a result of each lens.  Additionally, various models of what it means to be a professional practitioner and how these models influence our thinking, behavior and actions was explored.  The session was concluded with a question and answer period.
Target Audience: All interpreters and interested stakeholders
Series: Webinars hosted by Texas DARS

CEUs: GS 0.15

Resource Links 
PowerPoint Slides
Session Recording
Session Transcript

 

Deaf VR Professionals and Designated Interpreters

Date originally aired: October 27, 2014
Presenter: Trudy Schafer
Description: The importance of access and inclusion for the 24/Deaf Professional within their work environment requires that interpreters consider alternative models for how they approach their work. This webinar will focus on the Deaf VR Professional and Designated Interpreter Model by examining how it contributes to the fuller participation of the Deaf Professional within their work context.  As well, some of the unique considerations and practices employed by interpreters using this model will be discussed.
Target Audience: All interpreters and interested stakeholders
Series: Interpreting in VR Settings 2014 Webinar Series

CEUs: PS 0.15

Resource Links 
PowerPoint Slides
Session Recording
Session Transcript Due to technical issues, the first few minutes of the webinar were not recorded.  Please refer to the transcript for the missing information.  The transcript is marked where the recording begins.
Questions that were not answered during the webinar

 

Deaf Interpreters within the VR System

Date originally aired: September 29, 2014
Presenters: Trenton Marsh and Jennifer Storrer
Description: Deaf interpreters bring a unique set of skills and experiences to the interpreted events—particularly when providing services to deaf individuals with unique linguistic considerations.  This webinar will focus on the contributions of Deaf interpreters within the VR system. Samples of Deaf interpreters in action will be provided and discussed.  Strategies for enhancing Deaf-hearing interpreter teams will also be explored.
Target Audience: All interpreters and interested stakeholders
Series: Interpreting in VR Settings 2014 Webinar Series

CEUs: PS 0.15

Resource Links 
PowerPoint Slides video clips within PPT: VR Clip 9, VR Clip 1, VR Clip 4
Session Recording
Session Transcript

 

Interpreting for Assessment and Evaluation Processes

Date originally aired: August 25, 2014
Presenters: Pauline Annarino and Cheryl Davis
Description: One of the unique aspects of interpreting in VR settings is the array of assessment and evaluation tools that are administered in determining appropriate services to provide to deaf VR clients.  This webinar will explore the challenges and strategies associated with interpreting assessment and evaluation tools.  Resources for skill development in this area will also be explored.
Target Audience: All interpreters and interested stakeholders
Series: Interpreting in VR Settings 2014 Webinar Series

CEUs: PS 0.15

Resource Links 
PowerPoint Slides
Session Recording
Session Transcript


Skills, Knowledge and Attributes of Interpreters Working in VR Settings

Date originally aired: June 16, 2014
Presenter: Glenn Anderson
Description: Through a review of the literature, expert consultation and collection of data from practitioners and VR professionals, a set of domains and competencies of interpreters working in the VR setting has been defined.  This webinar will introduce the domains and competencies of interpreters who work in the VR setting and consider ways in which competencies can be developed..
Target Audience: All interpreters and interested stakeholders
Series: Interpreting in VR Settings 2014 Webinar Series

CEUs: PS 0.15

Resource Links 
PowerPoint Slides
Session Recording
Session Transcript
Interview with Cheryl Sugg
Interview with Zania Musteen

 

Serving VR Clients: Demographics, Procedures and Services

Date originally aired: April 28, 2014
Presenters: Dee Clanton and Trudy Schafer
Description: This webinar will look at the deaf individuals who are served by VR by 1) exploring the demographics of clients, 2) identifying the procedures that must be followed in order for a deaf individual to receive VR services, and 3) what type of services are provided to VR clients.  This information will help interpreters to more fully appreciate the VR context and the needs of clients that are served.
Target Audience: All interpreters and interested stakeholders
Series: Interpreting in VR Settings 2014 Webinar Series

CEUs: PS 0.15

Resource Links 
PowerPoint Slides
Session Recording
Session Transcript
LFD Report
Model Paln
Case Codes Process Diagram

 

Roles and Responsibilities of VR Personnel

Date originally aired: March 24, 2014
Presenters: Cheryl Davis and Pauline Annarino
Description: One of the key elements of a system is the personnel that work within the system and their roles and responsibilities.  This webinar will continue to build on our understanding of VR as a system by considering the personnel with whom the interpreter will most consistently interact, their roles and responsibilities and how various personnel relate to one another in carrying out the goals and mission of the VR system.

Target Audience: All interpreters and interested stakeholders
Series: Interpreting in VR Settings 2014 Webinar Series

Due to technology issues, the session recording and transcripts are not available for this webinar.  Therefore CEUs cannot be earned for this archived webinar.  However, the information in the PPT is available to you.

Resource Links 
PowerPoint Slides

 

VR as a System

Date originally aired: February 24, 2014
Presenter: Anna Witter-Merithew
Description: This webinar builds on the Systems Thinking for Interpreters webinar by exploring VR as a System.  The VR structure will be discussed so that its individual and the inter-connectedness of the parts are understood.  This understanding can help interpreters to understand the context in which their work occurs and thus make more informed decisions regarding meaning, acts and practices.
Target Audience: All interpreters and interested stakeholders
Series: Interpreting in VR Settings 2014 Webinar Series

CEUs: PS 0.15

Resource Links 
PowerPoint Slides
Session Recording
Session Transcript

 

Systems Thinking for Interpreters

Date originally aired: January 27, 2014
Presenter: Anna Witter-Merithew
Description: The focus of this webinar is on Systems Thinking and how it can contribute to problem solving associated with interpreting. Systems Thinking is a way of thinking about, and a language for describing and understanding, the forces and interrelationships that shape the behavior of systems in which interpreters provide service. Systems thinking can help interpreters learn how to function within systems more effectively, and to act more in tune with the natural processes that exist within systems. As a result, interpreters can expand the range of controls they apply to manage demands associated within a given system.
Target Audience: All interpreters and interested stakeholders
Series: Interpreting in VR Settings 2014 Webinar Series

CEUs: PS 0.15

Resource Links 
PowerPoint Slides
Session Recording
Session Transcript

 

Interpreting Depositions

Date originally aired: September 21, 2013
Presenter: Carla M. Mathers
Description: Depositions form a part of pre-trial discovery engaged in typically by attorneys in civil matters. When a Deaf witness is to be deposed, court interpreters will be engaged. Table interpreters may also be present to monitor the interpretation. Frequently, depositions are videotaped to preserve the interpretation in case of later challenge. Depositions can also be used as evidence during a trial to impeach a witness who testifies differently from their testimony during the deposition. Highly accurate and competent interpretation at depositions ensures that impeachment at trial does not become an examination into the quality of the prior interpretation at the deposition. This seminar will set forth the basic procedures involved in a deposition and will set forth the common ethical and staffing considerations for the interpreter hired to interpret for a deposition. 
Target Audience: Interpreters interested in legal interpreting
Series: Summer 2013 Legal Interpreting Series

CEUs: PS 0.15

Resource Links 
PowerPoint Slides
Accessible Slide Content
Session Recording
Session Transcript

 

Interpreting in Domestic Violence Settings

Date originally aired: August 19, 2013
Presenter: Carla M. Mathers
Description: Domestic violence is a social problem that affects all sectors of society, and when Deaf people are involved, court and legal interpreters are called to interpret these high risk emotionally charged interactions. Many times, applications for protection from domestic violence are filed with little notice and implicate the need for emergency interpreting. From intake through final protective order hearings, this seminar will address the process and procedures generally followed as well as discuss the ethical and interpreting demands faced in these challenging matters.
Target Audience: Interpreters interested in legal interpreting
Series: Summer 2013 Legal Interpreting Series

CEUs: PS 0.15

Resource Links 
PowerPoint Slides
Accessible Slide Content
Session Recording
Session Transcript

 

Interpreting in Family Court

Date originally aired: July 29, 2013
Presenter: Carla M. Mathers
Description: Interpreters often find themselves interpreting in a myriad of domestic matters from contested divorces to child custody cases to the division of marital property. Interpreting for family law cases presents unique demands procedurally and interpersonally particularly when interpreting between adverse parties. Ethically, family law cases can be demanding and require quick thinking and action on the interpreter’s part. This session will explore the various matters an interpreter may be called to interpret, will explore the ethics involved in interpreting between hostile deaf parties, and will discuss specific legal vocabulary and definitions related to family law matters.
Target Audience: Interpreters interested in legal interpreting
Series: Summer 2013 Legal Interpreting Series

CEUs: PS 0.15

Resource Links 
PowerPoint Slides
Accessible Slide Content
Session Recording
Session Transcript

 

Secrets to Share with Deaf People about Interpreting in Court

Date originally aired: July 20, 2013
Presenter: Carla M. Mathers
Description: In legal interpreting seminars, it is often said that court interpreting is different from community interpreting. At times, these differences can pose ethical demands when interpreters feel constrained to conduct themselves in a manner that would be objectionable in a community setting. Court interpreters have an obligation to explain these conflicts and the rationale behind them to Deaf consumers in a considerate manner. This educational piece is a critical link to improve the relations between court interpreters and the communities we serve. This seminar will address the key protocol which presents a conflict between community and legal interpreting and suggest methods and rationale to be incorporated into the discussion with the Deaf consumer prior to interpreting in court.
Target Audience: Interpreters interested in legal interpreting
Series: Summer 2013 Legal Interpreting Series

CEUs: PS 0.15

Resource Links 
PowerPoint Slides
Accessible Slide Content
Session Recording
Session Transcript

 

Legal Interpreting Basics

Date originally aired: June 17, 2013
Presenter: Carla M. Mathers
Description: Legal settings constitute high risk interpreting. Many interpreters avoid legal interpreting because of the fear that they might do more harm than good if they interpret in a legal setting without the proper training and credentials. This seminar aims to assist generalist interpreters understand the path to legal interpreting, the type of skills and competencies necessary and the support available from the legal interpreting community.
Target Audience: Interpreters interested in legal interpreting nation-wide
Series: Summer 2013 Legal Interpreting Series

CEUs: PS 0.15

Resource Links
PowerPoint Slides
Accessible Slide Content
Session Recording
Session Transcript

 

Anatomy of an Interpretation

Date originally aired: May 23, 2013
Presenter: Rhonda Jacobs 
Description: This webinar, geared toward interpreter educators and working interpreters, with or without experience working with people who are deaf-blind, will build upon the previous webinar, A Process Model for Deaf-Blind Interpreting, and examine an interpretation done by a Deaf interpreter working with a Deaf-Blind individual, looking at how various aspects of an interpretation are done, particularly the incorporation of visual information. For participants who did not participate in the previous webinar, there will be a brief review of the process model of interpreting previously presented.
Target Audience: Interpreter Educators, Working Interpreters
Series: Deaf-Blind Series

CEUs: PS 0.15

Resource Links 
PowerPoint Slides
Accessible Slide Content
Session Recording
Session Transcript

 

A Process Model for Deaf-Blind Interpreting

Date originally aired: February 21, 2013
Presenter: Rhonda Jacobs
Description: This webinar, geared toward interpreter educators and working interpreters, with or without experience working with people who are deaf-blind, will present A Process Model for Deaf-Blind Interpreting as published in the 2005 Journal of Interpretation, updated to include work published since 2005. Participants will examine a process model of interpreting as it relates to deaf-blind interpreting, considering such elements as visual information, message analysis, contextual analysis, linguistic modifications and back-channeling.
Target Audience: Interpreter Education Program faculty, internship hosts/supervisors, mentors, working interpreters & IEP students
Series: Deaf-Blind Series

CEUs: PS 0.15

Resource Links
PowerPoint Slides
Accessible Slide Content
Session Recording
Session Transcript

 

Strategies on Infusing Deaf-Blind Related Content into the IEP Curriculum – A Share Shop Amongst Instructors

Date originally aired: November 15, 2012
Presenter: Susanne Morgan Morrow, MA, CI, CT
Description: It is the intention of Interpreter Education Programs to prepare well-rounded, knowledgeable and skilled practitioners. Yet we are doing them a disservice by not providing adequate exposure and experiences specific to deaf-blind interpreting strategies. A recent survey conducted by the National Task Force on Deaf-Blind Interpreting & the National Consortium of Interpreter Education Centers validated this concern as many instructors reported a lack of the requisite content knowledge and skills that are needed to teach deaf-blind content. This online webinar will provide a platform for the sharing of resources amongst IEP instructors on content, activities and materials that are available. Content will be shared from the national survey of interpreter educators, examples of content that should be incorporated and activities for inclusion into the IEP will be suggested. IEP instructors will be asked to share their own ideas and suggestions to their colleagues.
Target Audience: Interpreter Education Program faculty, internship hosts/supervisors, mentors, working interpreters & IEP students
Series: Deaf-Blind Series

CEUs: PS 0.15

Resource Links 
PowerPoint Slides
Session Recording
Session Transcript

 

It Takes A Village … Taking a Closer Look at Interpreter Education and Community Capacity

Date originally aired: August 23, 2012
Presenter: Paula Gajewski Mickelson
Description: Interpreting is a profession born of the community. As interpreter education programs have moved to academia and the academic bar continues to raise, the challenge facing programs and faculty is in finding “the zone” – that sweet spot that balances academia and the real-life learning that can only happen through community involvement. Interpreting students will often take the knowledge they learn into the community via observations, volunteer work, service learning, internships and other activities. Members of the Deaf Community are a vital, necessary part of this mix. Programs must have internship sites that have experienced strong interpreter supervisors to oversee student work.  Community involvement and resources are necessary for program and student success. At the same time, more and more community members and internship sites are saying “thanks, but no thanks.” “We’d love to help, but we can’t this time.” “We are already working with students from other programs, we can’t do more.” “How does this (hosting an intern/volunteering for the program) benefit me?”  This webinar will begin to explore the idea of community capacity with program directors from interpreter education programs across the country.
Target Audience: IEP students, IEP faculty, Internship Hosts/Supervisors, Mentors and Working Interpreters.

CEUs: PS 0.15

Resource Links
PowerPoint Slides
Accessible Slide Content
Session Recording
Session Transcript

 

Integrating Observation-Supervision into Your Program Curricula

Date originally aired: June 21, 2012
Presenter: Robyn Dean
Description: The first three webinars in this four part series introduced viewers to the theoretical framework of Demand-Control Schema (DC-S), how to discuss interpreting demands/controls using a paradigm of teleological ethics, and how to put all the DC-S constructs together by using sample cases and situated practice examples to highlight how these DC-S constructs are used to analyze interpreting cases. This included an explanation of demand constellations, consequences and professional values. Some viewers then participated in three online learning communities were they continued to learn about demand-control analyses. In this session we will discuss how analytic skills (demands and controls, dialogic work analysis) are not an end unto themselves but a means by which students and professionals continue to learn and develop their knowledge, confidence, and skill sets. In particular, we will discuss experiential learning techniques such as, observation-supervision. Through in-vivo observations of service settings - involving only hearing people (e.g., a doctor's appointment, an AA meeting, a community education class) - students and practitioners can be exposed to the EIPI demands of those work contexts. Through supervision discussions, educators can take the EIPI data collected from the students (via observation forms) and make the important connections between what they observed and how that new knowledge will better prepare them to work in those settings and how to deal in general with the job demands of interpreting.
Note: This webinar series is taught with the assumption that viewers have the information from each previous webinar and online learning community. However, each webinar is open to anyone.
Series: Demand-Control Schema

CEUs: PS 0.15

Resource Links
PowerPoint Slides
Accessible Slide Content
Session Recording
Session Transcript

 

University of Alberta Collaboration Webinar on Community Interpreting

Date originally aired: April 12, 2012
Presenter: Dr. Jemina Napier from Australia
Description: This webinar will give an overview of how interpreting research studies in spoken and signed languages have impacted on community interpreting practice. Seminal studies will be presented that have changed our view of our role as mediators of communication, with discussion of shifting trends in practice and pedagogy that have been influenced by evidence-based research.
Target Audience: Working Interpreters and Students

CEUs: PS 0.15

Resource Links
PowerPoint Slides
Accessible Slide Content
Session Recording
Session Transcript

 

Strategies for Exploring the Complexities of Ethical Decision Making for Students

Date originally aired: February 23, 2012
Presenter: Paula Gajewski Mickelson
Description: Circle Processes are an important part of many cultures and indigenous populations around the world and are used as a means for collective decision making, community sharing and dispute resolution. Elements of Circle Processes are also used in parts of our society as a way to build community, resolve conflict, and reach consensus. The Circle is a non-hierarchical, shared space, developed by its participants and is used as a means to share information and learn of others’ perspectives and beliefs in safe, non-threatening manner. The purpose of this webinar is to provide a forum to learn about Circles and how to facilitate Circle Processes as a way to discuss and analyze various components of ethics and decision making. Insights from a variety of perspectives including research on conflict in interpreting, conflict theory, communications and professional guides such as the NAD-RID Code of Professional Conduct will all be a part of this discussion. Participants will be introduced to concepts of Circle Processes including the format of Circles, the role and function of Circle Keepers, and strategies to utilize this process with students and colleagues to unpack and discuss case studies explore ethical decision making. 
Note: This webinar series is taught with the assumption that viewers have the information from each previous webinar and online learning community. However, each webinar is open to anyone. Previous webinars are available on the MARIE page of this website while information covered in the online learning community is not available after the fact.
Target Audience: IEP students, IEP faculty, Internship Hosts/Supervisors, Mentors and Working Interpreters.
Series: Demand-Control Schema

CEUs: PS 0.15 

Resource Links
PowerPoint Slides
Accessible Slide Content
Session Recording
Session Transcript

 

DC-S and the Dialogic Work Analysis - Part II

Date originally aired: November 19, 2011
Presenter: Robyn Dean 
Description: The first two webinars in this four part series introduced viewers to the theoretical framework of Demand-Control Schema (DC-S) and how to discuss interpreting demands/controls using a paradigm of teleological ethics. This included an explanation of demand constellations, consequences and professional values. Some viewers then participated in two online learning communities were they continued to learn about demand-control analyses. The third webinar puts all the DC-S constructs together (identifying and articulating demands, controls, and consequences and their relationship to professional values and professional responsibility) by using sample cases and situated practice examples to highlight how these DC-S constructs are used to analyze interpreting cases. Note: This webinar series is taught with the assumption that viewers have the information from each previous webinar and online learning community.
Audience: IEP students, IEP faculty, Internship Hosts/Supervisors, Mentors and Working Interpreters.
Series: Demand-Control Schema

CEUs: PS 0.15

Resource Links
PowerPoint Slides
Accessible Slide Content
Session Recording
Session Transcript

 

DC-S and the Dialogic Work Analysis - Part I

Date originally aired: 8/25/2011
Presenter: Robyn Dean Summary: The first webinar in this four part series introduced viewers to the theoretical framework of Demand-Control Schema (DC-S). Some viewers then participated in an online learning community were they learned to construct quality demand-control analyses (based on the eleven scales of the DC-S Rubric). This second webinar will educate viewers on how to discuss interpreting demands and controls using a paradigm of teleological ethics – ethics based on the consequences of decisions. Viewers will learn how to construct demand constellations and how to formulate an ethical structure that involves the weighing consequences of decisions in light of professional values and execution of professional responsibility.
Target Audience: IEP students, IEP faculty, Internship Hosts/Supervisors and Mentors.
Series: Demand-Control Schema

CEUs: PS 0.15

Resource Links
PowerPoint Slides
Accessible Slide Content
Session Recording
Session Transcript

 

Introduction to Demand Control Schema

Date originally aired: 5/19/2011
Presenter: Robyn Dean
Description: During this first session, in a series of four, you will be introduced to the theoretical construct of DC-S and how to use these constructs in your teaching and/or interpreting practice. You will gain a theoretical framework for DC-S and be introduced to the four demand categories: Environmental, interpersonal, paralinguistic, and intrapersonal (collectively noted as EIPI) as well as the opportunities to employee controls: pre-assignment, during assignment, and post assignment. Lastly, we will explore the use of the DC-S Grading Rubric to yours and your students’ demand-control analyses and/or your post assignment reflections.
Target Audience: IEP students, IEP faculty, Internship Hosts/Supervisors and Mentors.
Series: Demand-Control Schema

CEUs: PS 0.15

Resource Links
PowerPoint Slides
Accessible Slide Content
Session Recording
Session Transcript