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University History: A Photographic History of UNC

Buildings & Grounds, Central Campus

 

 
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The original land for the Normal School was donated by John P. Cranford and his wife.

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The first building on campus, the Normal School Building, was built in stages, first the east wing, then the center, and then the west wing.  The cornerstone was laid on June 13, 1890.  From 1906-1931 the building was known as the Administration Building and from 1931-1972, it was Cranford Hall. 

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Cranford Hall was the central academic and administrative building on campus for many years.  The photo on the right depicts the chapel room in Cranford.  President Crabbe (1916-24) required students to attend chapel.

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Welby Wolfe, technical director of the Little Theatre of the Rockies, stands on the stage in 1949 after a major fire in Cranford. 

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In 1972, Cranford Hall, condemned as unsafe, was demolished.  This original campus building was designed by prominent Colorado architect, Robert S. Roeschlaub; he also designed the 1907 Library on campus, the Central City Opera House, University Hall at Denver University, and many other important buildings throughout the state. 

 

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As a part of the University’s Centennial in 1989-90, the cornerstone from Cranford Hall was installed in Cranford Park—the site of the first campus building.

 

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The land south of Cranford Park and north of the Visitor/Alumni Center was originally used as playgrounds and for sporting events. Cranford Field was the first athletic arena and was in use from 1890 until 1927, when it was replaced by Jackson Field on the east campus. The stands for spectators (right) were along 10th Avenue.

 

 

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The SATC (Student Army Training Corps) Gymnasium, built during WWI, served the school’s athletics programs from 1918-26.  The SATC gym was also known as the “Green Barn” and the “Cow Barn”.  It was razed in 1927, shortly after Gunter Hall of Health was completed. 

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Gunter Hall, dedicated in 1928, was the first campus building erected during George W. Frasier’s presidency.  Its modified Cathedral Gothic style architecture and the color of its brickwork are repeated in several Greeley buildings including Greeley Central High School. Gunter’s bells are important community icons.

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Left: The architectural details of the Gunter interior are almost as well known as the exteriors. 
Center: Wonderful pictures of athletic standouts from the beginning days of the institution.
Right: The stairwell mural depicting health, recreation and sports topics is in the east stairwell between the first and second floors.

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The gymnasium room of the Gunter Hall of Health included a balcony; the hall seated 1,100 people. 
The balcony was removed in 1957 due to fire code requirements; folding bleachers were then installed.

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Money to build Guggenheim Hall (1910- ) was donated by U.S. Senator Simon Guggenheim.  It was the home of the fine and industrial arts programs. Senator Guggenheim donated buildings to the Colorado School of Mines and the University of Colorado as well. 

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A major fire engulfed Guggenheim in 1951.

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The Home Economics Practice Cottage was used by students as a domestic sciences laboratory.  The women lived in the Cottage for several weeks to practice their skills.  It was later renamed Roudebush Cottage.

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The Home Economics Building on 8th Avenue was one of the three campus buildings renamed by action of the Board of Trustees in 1931, the other two were Kepner and Cranford.  The Home Economics Building became Crabbe Hall in honor of the College’s third president, John Grant Crabbe. 

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The Training School was built and occupied in segments starting with the center in 1912 and ending with the erection of the east wing in 1923.  It was the K-12 school building until Bishop-Lehr was completed in 1962.  In 1931, the building was renamed in honor of long-time trustee, Harry Kepner (1911-47).

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Kepner Hall, the former Training School is now the home of the Monfort College of Business.  Extensive remodeling in 1986-87 updated the building to accommodate the newest technology necessary to support the business curriculum. 

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Snyder Hall was built in 1936 as a Federal Public Works Project, as were Sabin and Tobey Kendel.  Snyder was named for President Snyder’s wife, Margaret.  Originally there was a lily pond in front of Snyder; it was removed in 1955 after vandals attacked it.  Over the years, the porch has been both white and brown.

 

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Wilson and Wiebking Halls were built in 1957 east and south of Snyder and Sabin.  The top photo shows houses in the residential neighborhood before construction began.  A list of those houses and their owners is in the Building Survey report for Wilson Hall, available in Archives.

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The Dutch Colonial Revival architectural precedent started in 1921 with the building of Decker, Gordon and Belford.  This theme is continues in the remaining dormitories on the central campus. 

 
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Four Tudor style faculty apartment buildings were constructed on the central campus between 1930 and 1947.  These were initially rented to faculty members.  Bonds sold to build the structures were repaid with rents collected.  In 2003, these buildings became parts of the student residence halls program. 

 

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The first library on campus was in the Normal School Building (Cranford Hall).

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In 1907, a new library was built (later to be remodeled and renamed Carter Hall). Left: Albert Carter, standing behind the circulation desk, was the librarian from 1902-1933.

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A major remodel of the library building was completed in 1940.  The architectural style transformed from the classical to the “moderne”.  The building was renamed Carter Hall in 1944.

 

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Frasier Hall, completed in 1953, has since served music and theater students and faculty.  It was named after George Willard Frasier, President of the College from 1924-47, an astounding 23 years.

 

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The Garden Theater, dedicated in 1940, was the venue for numerous spring graduation ceremonies and was the home of the “Concert Under the Stars” series that ran from 1931-2002.

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The first president’s home (left) was completed in 1904 and was occupied by the various presidents until 1924.  That year, it became the Music Conservatory and was used as such until it was replaced by Frasier Hall in 1954.  The Music Conservatory was located where the Music Library now stands.
The second president’s home (right) was completed in 1928; George W. Frasier and his family were its first occupants.  It was the home of every president until 1998 when it became the University’s Visitor’s Center and Alumni Office. 

 

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The Women’s Club House, built in 1916, was remodeled and renamed the Student Union in 1939.  The interior of the Women’s Club House now serves as the office for the University’s Parking Services.

 

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The popular student café, the Bru Inn, was located in the west wing of the Student Union.  It was named in honor of the school mascot, the bear.

 

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Brown’s College Store was a campus landmark for students from the 1950s through the mid 70s.  It was on the south east corner of 18th Avenue at 17th Street. 

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Gates at several of the entrances on campus were gifts of various graduating classes. 
The Horace Mann gates at 10th Avenue and 18th Street (left and middle) were gifts of the Class of 1910. 
The gates at 8th Avenue and 17th Street (right) were gifts of the Class of 1912.

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“Hi Bridge” on the central campus (left) was donated by the Class of 1940. 
The drinking fountain nearby (middle) was from the Class of 1942.
The benches south of Frasier (right) came from the Class of 1954.
Many other classes gave similar gifts—these are among the most prominent. 

 

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The central campus has, and has had, outdoor furnishings of various types.  In 1940, Greeley resident and Italian immigrant, Leo Florio, donated a flagpole that stands north of Gunter.  Florio appreciated his opportunity to live in the United States.  Today, his descendants own Florio’s shoe store in downtown Greeley.

 

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Totem Teddy arrived on campus in 1914 from his original home with the Tlingit Indians of Alaska.  This totem qualified for repatriation as a Native American funerary object and was returned to the Tlingits in 2003.

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The school’s Green House, built in 1908 just south of the Library (Carter Hall), was used for college and K-12 classes as well as by groundskeepers.  It was dismantled and sold in 1936.

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Early groundskeepers and students relied upon horse power to accomplish work and for transportation. 
The picture (right) is from a 1914 Bulletin and shows the students’ barn built in 1909; it was the earliest parking garage on campus.

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