Interim recreation director does more than what's in his job description

By Brendan Hall


Friday, Feb. 11, The start of the day
It is 9 a.m. He sits at his desk, coffee in hand, and starts going through his 50 or so daily e-mails. Pictures of his family and famous musicians he has met such as Kenny Chesney and Toby Keith cover the white walls of his conventional office. The windowsill displays numerous flyers, from a model railroad museum to upcoming events at the Union Colony Civic Center, all promotions of the city of Greeley.  As interim recreation superintendent, Kyle Holman spends a lot of his time dealing with matters unrelated to this particular department. “I find myself doing a lot of accounting work in this position,” Holman said.

Kyle Holman makes morning calls

Kyle Holman, Interim Recreation Superintendent, makes some morning calls in his office located on the second floor of the Greeley Recreation Center. Photo by Brendan Hall


A bright yellow folder is his nemesis on this cool Friday morning. Refunds and weekly totals from various facilities all need his signature before the day is over and the weekend can begin.
Checking in
Not a half hour has gone by, and Holman already has visitors. In walks Wayne Leighton, manager for both Boomerang and Highland Hills ountry clubs, two golf courses under the supervision of the city of Greeley. Leighton is frustrated because the courses need scorecards and the club professionals are getting nervous. Holman provides a few suggestions, mostly names of individuals to contact, which puts Leighton at ease, knowing the job will be completed. A few minutes later, Bob Adams, interim leisure services director, strolls into Holman’s office with a fresh cup of coffee and the attire that would not suggest a casual Friday. Black slacks, a nice blue dress shirt and cell phone holder on his hip, Adams dresses the part of someone hoping interim drops from his title.
Back to work
Now it is 10 a.m. The three finish their small talk and jokes while Holman and Adams continue to suggest ideas to Leighton to insure the scorecards print on time. Adams and Leighton head back to the lobby and continue their morning greetings with other employees in the office. Holman turns back to his computer and continues checking e-mails. One by one he responds to messages, some taking longer than others, the yellow folder still untouched and avoided until later in the day.
A tour of the facilities
At around 11 a.m. Holman leaves the office, making sure the magnet next to his name in the main lobby moves to “out.” He heads to the Greeley Ice Haus, a full-size indoor hockey rink located in the middle of downtown Greeley. The facility is empty when he arrives, making the stop here a quick one.
For the next half hour, Holman drives to different parks, such as Island Grove Regional Park, one of Greeley’s largest. A versatile park, Island Grove holds numerous events yearly for the Front Range region and has gained a reputation as one of the most picturesque and versatile event complexes in the nation, according to the city of Greeley website. After a quick tour around Island Grove, Holman heads to the Jesus Rodarte Center.
Old friends
It is noon when Holman arrives. Before he can even close his driver door, he hears calls from a Crown Victoria pulling into the small parking lot. It is C.J. Archibeque, a Recreation Program Manager, who works extensively with the Rodarte Center. Archibeque parks his city of Greeley vehicle and exchanges greetings with Holman. They converse like brothers, no formality to their conversation, but they both respect one another. As they enter Archibeque’s office, Holman snatches a few pieces of candy from a dish and takes a seat. They talk for a while. Archibeque, energetic and personable, does most of the talking. The center is the central topic as Archibeque vents his frustration about the misconceptions of this community center. “I don’t like how people call it a cultural center,” Archibeque says. “This center is for the youth of the community, not just a particular culture.”
After their discussion, Archibeque takes Holman around the center to show him some of the new features, from the computer lab to the boxing ring, making sure to greet everyone he passes. Holman continues to check his watch as they walk around because he has a lunch to attend with some friends and does not want to keep them waiting.
Almost home
As they part, both share some quick jokes and head their separate ways. It is 1 p.m. Holman heads to lunch with the day almost done on this light Friday. The only thing keeping him from the weekend and his family is that yellow folder with forms still waiting for his signature.

HOLMAN STAYS CLOSE TO HOME
• From La Salle
• University of Northern Colorado graduate (journalism and mass communication major with public relations emphasis)
• Worked at University of Northern Colorado as an assistant athletic director for marketing (during UNC’s transition to Division I) handling sponsorships and advertising.
• Worked with Greeley Independence Stampede for five years before working for the city of Greeley.