Training

We offer many training opportunities for graduate students in Counseling Psychology and Clinical Psychology programs of study.

Doctoral Internship

Thank you for your interest in the UNC Counseling Center internship program! The doctoral internship program in professional psychology at the University of Northern Colorado Counseling Center is now welcoming applications for the 2014-2015 training year. The application deadline is November 11, 2013. We welcome and encourage applications from individuals from diverse backgrounds.

This full-time, 2000-hour predoctoral Internship program is designed to provide a broad-based professional training experience in the range of activities carried out by psychologists in a university counseling center.This internship is designed for doctoral candidates who will have completed their practicum requirements and who are at the pre-doctoral level of training.  If you have any questions about our program or about the application process, please feel free to contact the Training Director, Dr. Meredith Shefferman, at: meredith.shefferman@unco.edu or (970) 351-2496.

Our program participates in the APPIC Match (Program Code: 201111) and follows all APPIC Match policies. This internship site agrees to abide by the APPIC policy that no person at this training facility will solicit, accept, or use any ranking-related information from any intern applicant. Please note that we are not yet accredited by the American Psychological Association.

 

Our Model & Philosophy of Training:

The model of training that we have adopted at the UNC Counseling Center is best described as a “Developmental Apprenticeship” approach.  We believe that becoming a competent psychologist is a developmental process requiring graduated experiences, experiential training, supervision, didactic training, and mentorship.  Consequently, UNC offers a variety of levels of training programs, from practicum to internship.  The training experiences offered, skills and knowledge imparted, and level of autonomy allowed vary with each of these levels.  Expectations for more advanced professional functioning and the projection of a professional identity also increase with each level.

At the doctoral internship level, training largely consists of experiential learning supplemented by supervision, mentorship, and didactic learning.  The staff encourages interns to assess their professional strengths and limitations and assists them in developing appropriate learning experiences to guide their growth within the parameters of the training opportunities offered here at UNC.  Over the course of the internship, as we see competence and confidence levels increase for the intern, we are committed to creating opportunities across all skill areas that will foster greater autonomy and independent functioning. This aspect of the internship includes allowing an intern to engage in activities such as serve as a campus-based consultant, manage one's own caseload of clients, co-lead a therapy group with another intern or less experienced graduate student, develop a special interest area, provide clinical supervision for a practicum student, and design psycho-educational workshops for the campus community.  We do this as a means of facilitating the transition from being a "trainee" to becoming a professional psychologist. 

One aspect of developmental models of training is the concept of “stages of growth” and the assumption that skills and knowledge build upon established skills and knowledge.  Training is intentionally sequential, cumulative, and graded in complexity.  A second aspect is that more is involved in being an effective professional than only skills and knowledge.  A sense of professional identity and an integration of oneself as a person into that professional role are also essential. Confidence level and the sense of professionalism evolve with years of experience and expanded training opportunities. 

Even within levels of training, different trainees have different amounts of prior experience, intervention skills, theoretical knowledge, personal motivation, and professional maturity.  Moreover, they have a variety of career goals and interests.  Hence, individual assessment, establishment of individualized learning goals, and a plan for reaching those goals is necessary for each intern.  We aim to meet each trainee where he or she is at, and challenge them appropriately with varying clinical experiences and degrees of autonomy.
           
Mentorship in our training program is indicated by a genuine commitment to both individual and group supervision. Interns are considered developing professionals and are encouraged to work closely with senior staff members, who provide mentoring and serve as professional role models for our trainees. Overall, we strive to create an atmosphere of respect and trust where interns and professional staff support one anothers' growth, both personally and professionally.  Staff members model ethical and professional clinical approaches and they participate in teaching through supervision, consultation, and teaching of seminars devoted to the professional development of interns. Staff members utilize a variety of theoretical orientations in their clinical work, including cognitive, cognitive-behavioral, interpersonal, mindfulness-based, feminist, systems, existential, and solution-focused. Regardless of the primary orientations of each staff member, all staff believe the therapeutic relationship is the key contributor to therapy process and progress. Therefore, interns have the opportunity to gain exposure to a variety of therapeutic approaches and styles, while still refining their ability to attend to relational dynamics and use the therapeutic relationship as a primary tool or change mechanism.

We aim to train interns as skilled generalists equipped to work in a variety of post-internship employment settings. To accomplish this, we provide a range of didactic and experiential training activities that psychologists in a university counseling center setting or other similar mental health settings are likely to encounter, including: individual, couples, and group psychotherapy, clinical intake assessment, crisis intervention, outreach and consultation, provision of supervision, assessment, multicultural competence, and ethical comportment.

Our staff also recognizes the importance of clinical practice that is informed by scholarly inquiry. Theoretical and research literature is integrated with experiential components of training. Administrative and policy decisions at our center are informed by scholarly review of both empirical and theoretical literature, as well as our center's ongoing examination of service utilization, client demographics, results of the CCAPS (which all clients take upon intake and at scheduled intervals during their treatment), and client satisfaction. Results of ongoing satisfaction surveys and the CCAPS may also inform areas in need of attention for clinical staff and trainees.  Interns will be trained in various empirically supported treatment approaches, as well as in outcome assessment and the integration of science and practice.

Our internship program attends to diversity/multicultural issues throughout various training activities, including didactic training, supervision, and actual clinical experiences with a diverse client population. The staff of The Counseling Center is committed to the awareness and affirmation of diversity in all our clinical and non-clinical endeavors. We are dedicated to offering an internship and counseling center that encourages and conveys respect, concern, and understanding for individuals of all backgrounds.

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Descriptions of Internship Activities:

This is a full-time 2000-hour internship, which requires 500 hours of direct clinical service. Interns are expected to work 40 hours per week. Direct service includes individual, group, and couple's psychotherapy; intake assessment; crisis intervention; outreach to students, faculty, and staff; and direct individual supervision of a doctoral-level practicum student. Please see the below description of activities and sample Intern Activities Time Allotment for a breakdown of all clinical and non-clinical internship activities (*please note that the hourly requirements represent an average and may shift slightly).

  1. Direct Service Components
    Clinical Services

    Interns devote a minimum of 20 hours per week on average to clinical activities (direct client contact).  These include the following:
    1. Individual/Couples Therapy:  Interns devote a minimum of 14 hours per week to providing psychotherapy services to individual clients and couples.
    2.  Group Therapy:  Interns co-lead, with a senior staff member, at least one therapy group each semester [2 hours per week].  Most groups are process-focused and some are theme oriented.  Structured groups with a skill-building focus may also be offered. 
    3. Intake Assessment:  Interns are responsible for providing at least 2-3 intake assessments each week.  Interns may be asked to provide additional intake slots during high peak times during the semester or if their caseloads do not meet minimum requirements. 
    4. Daytime Emergency Coverage (“OCD”; On-Call of the Day):  In addition to scheduled intakes, each intern is responsible for providing emergency coverage for walk-in clients.  Each intern will be on OCD for a 4-hour shift each week.  During this time, the intern must be available and on-premises, with one specific emergency slot set aside for students who are in crisis. The OCD coverage time does not count toward the intern’s direct clinical hours unless the intern actually responds to a call or crisis.            
    5. After Hours Emergency Coverage:  To provide the hours required for a 2000-hour internship and to contribute to the safety and functioning of the university, interns will complete after-hours emergency service on a rotation basis.  Each intern will be on-call for a one-week period of time, twice per semester.  During this time, they will carry the Center's emergency cell phone with them.  The on-call time does not count toward the intern’s direct clinical hours unless the intern actually responds to a call or crisis. During fall semester, the intern's primary supervisor will provide back-up emergency coverage.
    6. Supervision of Practicum Students: Each intern will engage in a clinical supervision experience of a doctoral-level practicum student.  Three hours per week will be allotted to this experience (1.5 hours of face-to-face supervision with trainee and 1.5 hours of supervision prep time to review notes and tapes).  We will make every attempt to provide interns with supervision experience during both the fall and spring semesters, though this cannot always be guaranteed due to practicum student availability.  Opportunities for supervising a practicum student over the summer may also be available.    
    7. Outreach and Prevention Programs: Outreach and Prevention programs are an important part of Counseling Center services.  Early outreach and prevention can often enable students to deal with concerns before they develop into more serious problems.  Moreover, outreach and consultation services are necessary to meet the needs of those groups of students who do not actively ask for help by approaching a counseling center or other mental health agency.  Research supports the use of alternative services to effectively address the needs of culturally diverse and non-traditional students. Interns participate in a variety of outreach activities, such as presentations, university-wide fairs, and consultation projects.  An average of 2 hours per week of outreach and consultation is allotted in the weekly schedule during fall and spring.  Some weeks will not include any outreach activities, while other weeks might require several hours of outreach.  We require a minimum of 12 outreach activities over the course of the internship.  These activities can include (but are not limited to):  Alcohol/Depression/ Eating Disorder screenings, presenting a workshop at the Journey Conference (a 1-day empowerment/self-esteem conference for at-risk high school girls), presenting at Eating Disorders Awareness Week, and other trainings/presentations as requested by various campus agencies over the course of the year.  Interns also team up with our senior-staff Cultural Center liaison to assist with consultation and outreach efforts with a campus cultural center of the intern's choice (i.e., The Marcus Garvey Cultural Center, Asian-Pacific American Student Services Center, Cesar Chavez Cultural Center, Native American Student Services Center, GLBTA Office, etc.). Interns will also work closely with our Counselor-in-Residence to assist with consultation and outreach efforts with our campus Residence Hall Directors and RA's over the course of the year. Occasional evening and weekend outreach will be required.
    8. Assessment: Interns are expected to integrate use of appropriate self-report and objective personality assessment tools into their clinical work for diagnostic purposes and to measure client progress.  Interns will gain familiarity with various self-report assessment tools, including the Beck Depression Inventory, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, Eating Attitudes Test, etc.  Interns are required to administer at least two objective personality assessment batteries (i.e., MMPI, MCMI, and/or PAI) with one of their clients during the course of the internship year.  Interns will receive at least two trainings per semester on assessment as part of the Professional Development seminar and will meet periodically for individual supervision with the Assessment Coordinator. Interns will also be trained in use of the SASSI and may have the opportunity to admister at least one AOD (Alcohol and Other Drugs) assessment during the internship under the supervision of a senior staff member.
  2. Non-direct Training Activities (Supervision, Seminars, Special Interest Areas)
    1. Individual Supervision:  Interns will receive a minimum of 2 hours per week of individual supervision.  The intern's primary supervisor will provide supervision for psychotherapy/counseling, agency issues, and professional development.  The supervisor will review client recordings and have knowledge of all clients being seen by the intern.  In addition, the primary supervisor will assist the intern with supervision of practicum students.  The supervisor will also serve as advocate and consultant for other Center-related activities and can assist the intern in decisions relating to professional development.  Supervisors will provide written feedback at mid-semester and end-of-semester evaluation meetings.  Interns typically have a different supervisor each semester.  Interns will rank their top two supervisor choices and the Training Director will make the final assignment based on intern preferences, training needs, and available Center resources.
    2. Professional Development Seminar:  Interns will address issues of professional growth and development, clinical and multicultural issues, and entry into professional psychology in this seminar.  Presentations by senior staff members, campus & community professionals, and interns cover a wide range of topics based on the intern group’s needs and interests.  Interns are welcome to make suggestions regarding topics they would like to see addressed in this seminar.  Sample topics have included:  Ethical and legal issues; empirically supported treatments; PTSD and trauma; mindfulness approaches; eating disorders; couples therapy; working with veterans; assessment; substance abuse; interpersonal violence; experiential therapies; job preparation; preparation for licensure, etc.  This seminar meets weekly for 1.5 hours throughout the course of the internship year.  Interns will be expected to present on an empirically supported treatment during this seminar.
    3. Group Seminar:  This seminar supplements interns’ experiential learning (i.e., direct service and weekly debriefings with co-leader) by providing additional information and opportunities for reflection and dialogue.  The seminar’s initial focus is on the Counseling Center’s group philosophy and procedures, Yalom’s interpersonal process theory, co-leader relationships, stages of group development, and group process dynamics and interventions.  Subsequently, the seminar provides an opportunity for case conference-type reflection and dialogue, viewing of video recordings, brainstorming of alternative interventions, and for enhancing knowledge about group stages and processes.  The Group Seminar meets weekly for 1.5 hours throughout the year.
    4. Supervision of Supervision Seminar:  This seminar trains interns in effective clinical supervision.  The seminar will balance knowledge with experience in order to develop the basic philosophy, skills, and confidence necessary for creating a productive supervisory relationship.  The seminar incorporates didactic information, modeling, role playing, and review of taped supervision sessions between interns and practicum students.  Didactic topics may include the following:  ethical and legal issues in the conduct of supervision; theories of supervision; developmental stages; multicultural counselor training; and the parallel processes involved in being a clinician, supervisor, and supervisee.  The seminar will also focus on balancing the various roles of an effective supervisor, such as, teacher, informal counselor, consultant, monitor, and evaluator.  This seminar meets weekly for 1.5 hours during the fall and spring semesters, and during the summer (if interns are providing summer supervision). 
    5. Multicultural Seminar:  This seminar meets for 1.5 hours every other week throughout the year.  The seminar provides a combination of didactic training about multicultural issues; process of personal identity, biases, and values; and case conference discussion of diverse clients.  This seminar includes topics such as:  Spirituality in Therapy; Men’s issues; GLBT issues; Learning Differences; First Generation College Students; Sizism; Hidden Identities; Disabilities; viewing of several films pertaining to diversity; meetings with the various Cultural Centers on campus; and multicultural case conferences and potlucks.  Interns are expected to participate actively and stretch themselves in this seminar.  Interns will have the opportunity to build various aspects of the seminar in order to tailor their learning experience.
    6. Intern Process Time:  Interns are allotted 1.5 hours every other week (alternating with the Multicultural seminar) to have time to meet as an intern cohort to process personal and professional issues that arise over the course of the internship. It is expected that interns will use this process time to seek support and feedback, work through conflicts, and discuss issues related to professional development.  The content of what is discussed in this group is expected to be held in confidence by the interns, unless requested otherwise by the group. If desired, the Training Director may join the Group to assist in processing any cohort issues or to receive feedback about the internship.
    7. Case Conference:  Case conference is designed to give interns additional
      opportunities to dialogue about their clinical work.  Informal case conference takes place during the weekly clinical staff meeting and in Multicultural Seminar.  One formal case presentation will also be required each semester, and will be presented to all clinical staff in the Clinical Meeting.
    8. Special Interest Areas:  There are a number of areas of competence that are commonly needed by psychologists working in university counseling centers.  To deepen the training experience of the interns in a way that will help them achieve additional competence and meet their personal training goals, a "Special Interest" component has been included in the internship training program.  Some of the areas previously identified for these training experiences have included drug and alcohol counseling, learning differences, eating disorders, men’s issues, supervision, mindfulness, religion/spirituality, or grief and loss.  Interns may also design special programs, typically with a service component, that uniquely meet their training needs. Interns are allocated one hour per week during the fall and spring semesters to pursue these special interest training experiences.  Two hours per week are allotted for a special interest area during the summer session. 
    9. Professional Development / Dissertation Time:  During the fall and spring semesters, interns may use 1 hour per week to work on projects and activities that will enhance their professional development or facilitate progress on their dissertations.  Interns may use 3 hours of professional development time over the summer semester.  In the past, interns have used these hours for such activities as dissertation or other research projects, professional reading, or additional training experiences. It should be noted that in times of very high client traffic, interns may be asked to see clients during their dissertation times.  Interns will have significant time to devote to dissertation and professional development over the holiday breaks and summer semester to make up for missed dissertation time during the academic semesters.
    10. Clinical Staff Meeting:  All clinical staff meet for two hours per week to staff current and incoming clients and to discuss clinical issues.  Case disposition of clients seen on intake will occur during this meeting.  This clinical meeting is an excellent opportunity for group supervision and for exchange of ideas between all senior staff members and trainees. Interns will present a formal case presentation each semester in the Clinical Meeting.
  3. Administrative Time
    1. Case Management/Paperwork:  Interns are allotted 5.5 hours each week to write clinical notes and intake reports, make client phone calls, respond to emails, and tend to other administrative tasks.  Paperwork time may be scheduled in blocks or spread out equally over the course of the week.

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Internship Goals, Objectives, and Competencies:

The Center staff believes that the role of a university counseling center psychologist requires a wide range of competencies, which underlie the program’s goals and objectives.  Doctoral internship training focuses primarily on the refinement of skills in the clinical, outreach and consultation, and supervision arenas, and on the translation of ethical/legal and multicultural knowledge into professional behavior.  The four primary goals and related core objectives and competencies of our internship program are outlined below. 

Goal 1Interns will develop appropriate clinical skills and competencies in preparation for entry level practice as professional psychologists.

  • Objective 1:  Interns will develop competency in the provision of individual psychotherapy
Competencies expected:
  • Interns will establish and maintain good working relationships with clients
  • Interns will demonstrate competence in basic microcounseling skills (i.e., reflection of feeling and content, paraphrasing, open-ended questions, etc.).
  • Interns will demonstrate the ability to process the therapeutic relationship with the client (i.e., immediacy, constructive use of transference & countertransference)
  • Interns demonstrate ability to appropriately confront clients and manage ruptures effectively
  • Interns will demonstrate ability to tolerate difficult emotions and explore clients’ feelings
  • Interns will demonstrate appropriate assessment of risk throughout the treatment process
  • Interns will exhibit ability to provide effective, evidence-based interventions
  • Interns will demonstrate ability to Integrate psychological theory into meaningful conceptualization
  • Interns will demonstrate ability to formulate appropriate treatment goals
  • Interns will demonstrate ability to conduct and integrate relevant assessment tools into their clinical work
  • Interns will demonstrate the ability to prepare clients for termination of treatment appropriately and sensitively
  • Interns will manage their caseloads effectively
  • Interns will demonstrate knowledge about, sensitivity and responsiveness to client’s culture, age, gender, sexual orientation, social class, religion, language, country of origin, and ability status in therapeutic interactions
  • Interns will demonstrate ability to appropriately integrate information from the scholarly literature into clinical work.
  • Objective 2:  Interns will develop competency in group therapy
Competencies expected:
  • Interns will demonstrate skill in group screening and client preparation for group therapy
  • Interns will demonstrate ability to establish rapport and cohesion in group work
  • Interns will demonstrate effective timing of interventions according to the developmental stage of the group
  • Interns will facilitate here-and- now group process
  • Interns will integrate theory and practice of group work
  • Interns will develop an effective working relationship with co-leader
  • Interns will demonstrate knowledge about, sensitivity and responsiveness to clients’ culture, age, gender, sexual orientation, social class, religion, language, country of origin, and ability status in therapeutic group interactions.
  • Objective 3:  Interns will develop competency in intake assessment and diagnosis
Competencies expected:
  • Interns will gather relevant data to define client’s concerns
  • Interns will assess relevant risks to health and safety of clients or others
  • Interns will make accurate judgment regarding case disposition or referral
  • Interns will utilize DSM classification and differential diagnosis effectively
  • Interns will conduct culturally competent intakes that consider the person’s diverse characteristics and the person and system in context.
  • Interns will demonstrate ability to gather essential and accurate psychosocial information, including issues related to diversity characteristics.
  • Objective 4:  Interns will develop competence in crisis intervention
Competencies expected:
  • Interns will gather relevant data to define client’s concerns
  • Interns will assess relevant risks to health and safety of clients or others
  • Interns will make accurate judgment regarding case disposition or referral
  • Interns will utilize DSM classification and differential diagnosis effectively
  • Interns will conduct culturally competent intakes that consider the person’s diverse characteristics and the person and system in context.
  • Interns will demonstrate ability to gather essential and accurate psychosocial information, including issues related to diversity characteristics.
  • Objective 5:  Interns will develop competency in outreach and consultation.
Competencies expected:
  • Interns will demonstrate consideration of the needs of the target audience
  • Interns will demonstrate adequate preparation for presentations
  • Interns will demonstrate the ability to include up-to-date scholarly research information about the content area.
  • Interns will demonstrate clear and effective presentation skills that engage the audience in an effective manner
  • Interns will evaluate the effectiveness of outreach programs with appropriate measures
  • Interns will demonstrate responsiveness and sensitivity to the needs of consultee(s)
  • Interns will provide consultation to staff, faculty, and community members in a manner that is ethical and professional
  • Interns will demonstrate knowledge, sensitivity, and responsiveness regarding outreach participants’ and consultees’ culture, age, gender identity, sexual orientation, social class, religion, language, country of origin, and ability status in developing and delivering outreach programs and consultation.
  • Objective 6:  Interns will develop competency in provision of supervision
Competencies expected:
  • Interns will demonstrate ability to develop a safe and respectful supervisory environment
  • Interns will demonstrate ability to apply supervision theory and scholarly literature in conceptualizing and intervening with supervisee
  • Interns will set effective goals for supervision in collaboration with supervisee
  • Interns will provide specific, concrete feedback to supervisee in a timely manner
  • Interns will demonstrate ability to provide an appropriate balance of support and challenge/confrontation to supervisee
  • Interns will demonstrate ability to make use of a variety of supervisory techniques to facilitate growth (i.e., role-playing, joint review of tapes, suggested readings, discussion, etc.)
  • Interns will demonstrate ability to appropriately evaluate supervisee
  • Interns will attend to multicultural issues and privilege in the supervisory relationship
  • Intern will demonstrate ability to effectively talk with supervisee about  the manner in which people of diverse cultures and belief systems perceive mental health issues and respond to various symptoms and interventions in counseling
  • Objective 7:  Interns will develop competency in use of mental health assessment tools
Competencies expected:
  • Interns will demonstrate ability to appropriately select self-report and objective personality assessment instruments
  • Interns will demonstrate ability to accurately administer and interpret assessment data
  • Interns will demonstrate ability to integrate clinical interview and assessment data into a comprehensive report that include appropriate recommendations
  • Interns will demonstrate ability to utilize assessment data to inform their treatment
  • Interns will demonstrate consideration of cultural factors in selection and interpretation of assessment materials

Goal 2Interns will demonstrate appropriate professional behavior and socialization into the profession of psychology

  • Objective 1: Interns will develop and maintain professional relationships and behavior
Competencies expected:
  • Interns will develop collegial, professional relationships within the UNC Counseling Center and university community
  • Interns will communicate effectively with clinical staff, support staff, peers, supervisees, etc.
  • Interns will demonstrate timeliness to meetings, sessions, supervision, seminars, etc.
  • Interns will demonstrate ability to manage conflict effectively
  • Interns will demonstrate ability to provide constructive feedback and support to peers
  • Interns will exhibit a professional identity (e.g., dress, behavior)
  • Interns will demonstrate ability to work as part of a professional team (i.e., flexibility, acting as a “team player”)
  • Interns will participate actively in seminars and meetings
  • Interns will demonstrate ability to follow agency policies
  • Objective 2:  Interns will demonstrate effective use of supervision
Competencies expected:
  • Interns will demonstrate adequate preparation for supervision
  • Interns will demonstrate openness/non-defensiveness to feedback
  • Interns will integrate supervisory feedback to improve skills
  • Interns will exhibit willingness to appropriately self-disclose
  • Interns will initiate their own professional development and demonstrate commitment to growth and learning

Goal 3: Interns will cultivate the knowledge and awareness needed for ethical practice as a psychologist.

  • Objective 1:  Interns will demonstrate knowledge and skill in implementing ethical and legal factors into professional role
Competencies expected:
  • Interns will demonstrate and apply knowledge of the APA Code of Ethics
  • Interns will demonstrate and apply knowledge of the State of Colorado legal and professional standards of practice
  • Interns will recognize and address ethical dilemmas appropriately
  • Interns will practice within bounds of competence
  • Interns will maintain appropriate and timely documentation of all clinical work
  • Interns will maintain appropriate boundaries with clients, trainees, etc.
  • Interns will consult and seek supervision appropriately
  • Objective 2:  Interns will demonstrate appropriate self-awareness needed for ethical practice
Competencies expected:
  • Interns will demonstrate ability to self-evaluate their skills, including strengths and areas of growth
  • Interns will demonstrate ability to engage in self-care and manage personal stress effectively
  • Interns will demonstrate awareness of own biases, needs, and beliefs
  • Interns will demonstrate awareness of countertransference issues with clients and supervisees

Goal 4:  Interns will demonstrate a commitment towards multicultural competency. 

  • Objective 1:  Interns will demonstrate awareness of and sensitivity to the impact of diversity issues
Competencies expected:
  • Interns will demonstrate awareness of how one’s personal identities (e.g., race, ethnicity, social class, religion, sexual orientation, ability status, gender, etc.) may impact clinical work and professional relationships
  • Interns will demonstrate awareness of how cultural factors influence clinical presentation, conceptualization, diagnosis, and the counseling process
  • Interns will engage in self-assessment of cultural skills and competencies, with recognition of own strengths and areas of growth.
  • Interns will demonstrate an appreciation for human differences and desire to grow multiculturally
  • Interns will articulate privileged identities and demonstrate awareness of how this privilege may impact the therapeutic process.
  • Objective 2:  Interns will provide competent multicultural practice
Competencies expected:
  • Interns will demonstrate culture-specific knowledge about diverse groups of people
  • Interns will demonstrate ability to gather essential and accurate psychosocial information related to diversity characteristics.
  • Interns will effectively process multicultural issues in clinical work and when receiving supervision.
  • Interns will demonstrate multiculturally competent individual therapy
  • Interns will demonstrate multiculturally competent group therapy
  • Interns will demonstrate multiculturally competent outreach and consultation programming
  • Interns will demonstrate multiculturally competent provision of supervision

Our intern evaluation forms flow directly from these goals, objectives, and competencies. Interns formally receive feedback on their performance twice per semester.

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Requirements for Successful Completion of Internship:

Successful completion of the internship will depend not only on accrual of the 2000 overall required hours and 500 direct clinical hours, but also upon earning adequate scores on written evaluations.  The intern must receive 70% of scores of “3” or higher on each objective area of the evaluation (see above objectives).  If an intern's evaluation form does not meet the requirement of 70% of 3's or higher on each major objective domain, a remediation plan will be put into place.  Please see the attached document for information about intern due process and grievance procedures.

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Training Staff:

  • Kim Wilcox, M. A., L.P.C., Director
  • Sarah Griess, Psy.D., L.P., Asst. Director, Training Director
    • I have been in the helping field since 1999 working with adolescents, adults, families, and adults with special needs in a variety of roles. I received my Masters Degree at the University of Nebraska at Kearney in Community Counseling and my Doctorate of Psychology at the University of Northern Colorado. I enjoy working on college campuses and have served students in Residence Life, Student Activities, as an adjunct faculty, and through the University Counseling Center. I follow a constructivist theory of conceptualizations and an integrated approach in practice, utilizing interpersonal, social justice, CBT, and constructivist theories. I love individual therapy and also have a passion for group. I currently co-facilitate a group for Survivors of Sexual Trauma. I thoroughly enjoy supervision, mentorship, and training. I am passionate about having the opportunity to engage in promoting the growth and development of future psychologists."
  • Rebekah Knight Baughman, Ph.D., Licensed Staff Psychologist
    • "I received my doctoral degree in Clinical Psychology from Fuller Theological Seminary in 2005. I have been at the UNC Counseling Center since 2010. My theoretical orientation is Psychodynamic and Interpersonal. My professional interests include: art therapy, trauma, eating disorders and body image concerns, spirituality, and identity development."
  • Linda Schmid, Ph.D., Licensed Staff Psychologist
    • "I have worked in college counseling for nearly 20 years- with a hiatus in that work in order to Clinical Director of a crisis and suicide hotline, and to pursue private practice and college teaching at Argosy University- Twin Cities. I received my Master's degree in Personality and Social Psychology from the University of Colorado, Boulder and then moved to Minnesota to work as a statistical analyst/ computer programmer for large epidemiological studies in public health. I earned my Ph.D. in Counseling and Student Personnel Psychology from the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities. I am a recent transplan from Minnesota, starting at UNC Counseling Center in 2012. I tend to work in a non-judgmental, practical and interpersonal way, blending humanistic, cognitive-behavioral, and psychodynamic theories. I am passionate about working with Transgender student concerns and Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Pansexual, and Genderqueer concerns."
  • Linda Baum, Ed,D., Licensed Staff Psychologist
    • " I received my Doctorate in 1991 from the University of Northern Arizona. My approach to therapy is integrative, combining systemic, interpersonal, cognitive, Buddhist, and existential theory. I have worked in a variety of settings including: adolescent day treatment, community mental health, child protective services, hospital settings, and university counseling centers. The following are areas of interest and expertise: anxiety, depression, developmental issues, LGBT issues, assessment, diagnostics, and psychological evaluations. I am also a trained mediator. I love doing Supervision and Supervision of Supervision, as I love mentoring new professionals entering the field."
  • Renee Gilkey, Psy.D., Licensed Staff Psychologist
    • "I received my graduate training through the American School of Professional Psychology, San Francisco. I have a strong interest in working with adolescents and adults with eating and body image issues, identity and relationship issues, mood disorders, and working with the college student population. While I thoroughly enjoy providing individual therapy, I have a strong interest in group therapy and currently lead Interpersonal Process Groups and Dialectical Behavior Therapy Groups. My theoretical framework is best described as an integrative approach to treatment that employs a relational framework and draws from CBT, mindfulness-based approaches, and interpersonal theory. I am passionate about training and supervision and enjoy providing individual supervision and trainings to both Master's and Doctoral-level students. Lastly, I currently serve as a liaison to the UNC Athletic Department and provide clinical services to our student-athletes in one of our center's satellite offices."
  • Leanne Seguin, Psy.D., Licensed Staff Psychologist
    • "I obtained my Psy.D. in Clinical Psychology at Argosy University in Atlanta. During my graduate experience, I conducted neuropsychological, IQ, achievement, and personality tests. Although I have enjoyed conducting assessments, my main focus and passion lies in counseling college students in individual and group therapy (Interpersonal, Grief & Loss, and Survivor's Group). My theoretical orientation is eclectic and thus I tend to conceptualize client's symptoms according to a person-centered, psychodynamic, relational, and cognitive behavioral model depending on the client's presenting issues, attachments, and personality. I also recently started a liaison position with the Cultural Centers in the hope that it will de-stigmatize counseling for minority students and provide students of color with greater support."
  • Steven Quackenbush, Ed.S.,LAC.,Assessment Coordinator
  • Lee Shefferman, Ph.D., LPC, Staff Psychologist
  • Jason Barnhart, MD, Psychiatrist

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Intern Stipend and Benefits:

Interns are currently paid $22,000 for full‑time work. The internship will start on Monday, July 21st, 2014 and end on Friday, July 17th, 2015. As a university employee, interns receive excellent benefits, including health insurance with generous employer contribution, vacation time, and sick leave.  Professional development time is also provided (up to 4 days per year) for attending conferences, job search interviews and/or dissertation committee meetings, contingent upon the approval of the Training Director.  Interns also receive 1 hour per week of dissertation release time and extensive dissertation release time over semester breaks and summer.

Interns are entitled to the full range of medical and insurance plans available to all exempt staff working on campus.  This includes major medical, dental, vision, long-term disability, and life insurance.   

Interns receive a staff I.D. card which allows them to use the UNC library and check out materials for an extended length of time.  Interns are also permitted to purchase a Faculty parking sticker, which allows for parking adjacent to Cassidy Hall.  Free, on-street parking is available near the Center.

The Center provides interns with private, fully furnished offices with a window.  Each office is equipped with a computer with word processing, electronic mail capabilities, and the Titanium scheduling package.  Web cams are installed in each trainee office to allow for digital recordings of client sessions. 

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Eligibility and Statement of Non Discrimination:

Eligibility
(a)  Applicants must be currently enrolled in an APA-accredited doctoral program in Counseling or Clinical Psychology.  We do not accept candidates who have already completed the doctoral degree.
(b)  Applicants must complete all doctoral coursework prior to the beginning of the internship. 
(c) Applicants must have successfully passed their comprehensive examinations by the time of their application to the internship.
(d) Applicants must have their dissertation proposals completed prior to the beginning of internship.
(e)  Applicants must be certified as ready for internship by their doctoral programs.
(f)  Applicants must demonstrate a strong and genuine interest in counseling center work.
(g) Applicants must have 400 practicum hours of direct intervention, including 100 hours of clinical experience with adults.
 
Statement of Non Discrimination
The University of Northern Colorado is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity employer that is committed to a culturally diverse staff, faculty, and student body. Women, minorities, persons with disabilities, and veterans are strongly encouraged to apply.

The University will not engage in unlawful discrimination in employment or educational services against any person because of race, religion, gender, age, national origin, disability, or veteran status. It is the University’s policy to prohibit discrimination in employment or educational services on the basis of sexual orientation or political affiliation.

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Application Instructions:

We only accept applications that are submitted electronically via the APPIC "AAPI Online" service.  Please follow directions for uploading your application on the APPIC website (http://appic.org), and then click on AAPI ONLINE.  A complete uploaded application includes the following materials:

(1) a cover letter;

(2) a complete, current curriculum vita;

(3) copies of all graduate school transcripts;

(4) three letters of reference, at least two of which must be written by current or past clinical supervisors who are familiar with your clinical skills.

We look forward to receiving your application and we welcome and encourage applications from diverse individuals!

 

Selection Process:

Application must be uploaded by November 11, 2014.

Applicants will be notified by e-mail of their interview status by December 13, 2014. Applicants who are selected for interviews will receive instructions to schedule their interviews through Genbook, an online scheduling program.

Telephone interviews (one-hour long with 2-3 senior staff members and 1 intern) will be conducted during the first two weeks of January, 2014. Applicants with a disability who require accommodations for the application process, interview, or training year are encouraged to contact the Training Director in order to discuss their needs. We are happy to make accommodations.

We are always happy to answer questions about our internship program. We also welcome in-person visits. Please note that these visits are optional and do not influence our selection decisions. Please direct your questions or requests for a visit to Dr. Sarah Griess or 970-351-2496.

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Accreditation Status:

The UNC Counseling Center is not currently accredited by the American Psychological Association, though we are currently pursuing initial APA accreditation. Our internship program was a recipient of one of the APA Board of Educational Affairs internship grants in January 2013. This generous grant permitted us to expand our internship to 3 slots and to defray the administrative costs of accreditation. We are currently in the final stages of writing the self-study, and are hopeful that we will be approved for a site visit. However, it should be noted that we cannot guarantee accreditation or guarantee a timeline for accreditation. For questions about the APA accreditation process, please contact the APA Office of Program Consultation and Accreditation:

750 First Street, NE

Washington, DC 20002

Phone: 202-336-5979

E-mail: apaaccred@apa.org

 

Helpful Links:

Please see the following links for examples of previous seminar schedules and training activities.

Fall 2012 Professional Development Seminar Schedule

Spring 2013 Professional Development Schedule

To learn more about the Greeley community and the UNC campus, please reference the following links.

www.greeleygov.com- City of Greeley website

www.unco.edu - University of Northern Colorado Web Site

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"This internship site agrees to abide by the APPIC policy that no person at this training facility will solicit, accept, or use any ranking-related information from any intern applicant."

 

Masters Internship

The UNC Counseling Center provides 1-2 Master's Level Counseling internship positions each academic year. This position is designed to assist counselors to develop and hone their skills in clinical interventions commonly used in a University Counseling Center or similar mental health settings.  The model of training that we have adopted at the UNC Counseling Center is best described as a “developmental apprenticeship” approach.  We believe that becoming a competent professional counselor is a developmental process requiring graduated experiences and a combination of experiential and didactic training with close supervision and mentorship.  Professional training will focus on the development and refinement of clinical skills and will include providing individual, couples and group psychotherapy (when available); conducting intake interviews; developing diagnostic, case conceptualization, and treatment planning skills; documenting psychotherapy in an ethical, concise, and timely manner; providing outreach presentations and consultation; collaborating as part of a treatment team; developing solid multicultural awareness and skill; and translating ethical and legal issues into professional behavior.

Master’s level training largely consists of experiential learning supplemented by didactic information and close supervision/mentorship.  As part of our developmental model, the staff encourages interns to assess their professional strengths and limitations and assists them in developing appropriate learning experiences to guide their growth within the parameters of the training opportunities offered here at UNC.  Over the course of the internship, as we see competence and confidence levels increase for the intern, we are committed to creating opportunities across all skill areas that will foster greater autonomy and independent functioning.

An intern’s typical week will include an average of 8-10 individual clients per week, 2 intakes per week, a minimum of 1-2 hours per week of individual supervision, opportunity to co-facilitate an Interpersonal Process Group, participation in our weekly Clinical Meeting, opportunities for outreach and consultation as needed, paperwork time, and participation in weekly Professional Issues Seminar and Group Seminar (if leading a therapy group).  Please see the explanations below of our supervision and seminars.              

Individual Supervision

The intern’s primary supervisor will provide a minimum of 1-2 hours per week of individual supervision.  The assigned supervisor will be a licensed professional counselor (LPC) or a licensed psychologist.  The supervisor will review client video recordings and have knowledge of all clients being seen by the intern.  The supervisor will also serve as advocate and consultant for other Center-related activities and will assist the intern in decisions relating to professional development.  Supervisors will provide written feedback at mid-semester and end-of-semester evaluation meetings.  Interns typically have a different supervisor each semester.  The Training Director assigns the supervisor pairings on the basis of the interns’ stated preferences, their training needs, and the available resources within the Center.  Intern input is welcome.

Professional Issues Seminar

Interns have the opportunity to participate in this weekly seminar that is dedicated to issues of professional growth and development, various psychological issues, and multicultural topics.  Presentations by staff members, community professionals, and interns cover a wide range of topics based on the intern group’s needs and interests.  Topics have included:  ethical issues in psychotherapy, documenting psychotherapy, eating disorders, substance abuse, domestic violence, mindfulness, spirituality, men’s issues, grief and loss, empirically-supported treatments, starting a private practice, attaining licensure, and a wide range of diversity-related topics.  Interns are welcome to make suggestions regarding topics they would like to see addressed in this seminar.

Group Seminar

If the intern has the opportunity to co-lead a therapy group, she/he will be required to participate in the Group Supervision Seminar.  This seminar supplements interns’ experiential learning (i.e., direct service and weekly debriefings with co-leader) by providing additional supervision and opportunities for reflection and dialogue.  The seminar’s initial focus is on UNC’s group philosophy and procedures, co-leader relationships, ethics, and group process dynamics and interventions.  Subsequently, the seminar provides an opportunity for case conference-type reflection and dialogue, for brainstorming alternative interventions, and for enhancing knowledge about group stages and processes.  Written group therapy evaluations are completed by the seminar leader and senior staff co-facilitators (or the interns’ senior staff group supervisor when the group is facilitated by two interns).  The Group Seminar meets weekly throughout the Fall and Spring semesters.

Case Conference (Clinical Staff Meeting)

Case conference is designed to give interns additional opportunities to dialogue about their clinical work with other interns and senior staff, and provides an opportunity for group supervision.  Interns are asked to informally present either an intake or an ongoing client for group discussion each week.   One formal case presentation will also be required each semester.

Outreach and Prevention Programs

Interns participate in a variety of outreach activities, such as presentations, university-wide fairs, and consultation projects.  An average of 1-2 hours per week of outreach and consultation is allotted in the weekly schedule (some weeks there will be no opportunities for outreach, while other weeks might require 3-4+ hours).  Occasional evening and weekend outreach will be required.  Examples of outreach activities can include (but are not limited to):  staffing the UNC Fall Bazaar, assistance with RA training, Alcohol/Depression/Eating Disorder screenings, the Journey Conference (a 1-day empowerment conference for middle-school girls from Weld County), participation in the Mental Health Summit, Eating Disorders Awareness Week, and other trainings/presentations as requested by various campus and community agencies over the course of the year.

Internship Requirements:

  • We only accept interns from CACREP programs.
  • Internship must be completed across 2 semesters (fall and spring).
  • 600 total hours required, 300 must be direct service.
  • Must commit to attending orientation (dates to be announced).
  • In order to complete the 600 hour requirement within the academic year (August-May), master's interns must be able to commit at least 20 hours a week (many will need to be able to devote 25-28 hours a week to compensate for lighter clinical loads at slower student traffic times).
  • Must be able to attend weekly clinical staff meeting (Tuesday mornings from 8:00-10:00).
  • Interns must participate in supervision of group therapy (if applicable) and in various trainings and seminars throughout the year.

Greeley Chamber of Commerence

University of Northern Colorado

To apply for a position:

  • Please send a cover letter describing your experience and interest in working in a university counseling center setting.
  • A resume
  • A list of 3 references (at least 1 of whom is familiar with your clinical work).

For more information or to submit your application, please contact:

University of Northern Colorado, Counseling Center

Attn: Sarah Griess, Ph.D., Training Director

Cassidy Hall, Campus Box 17

Greeley, Colorado 80639

970-351-2496

sarah.griess@unco.edu

Advanced Practicum

 

*APPLICATION DEADLINE- Monday, March 3rd, 2014

Description

The University Counseling Center (CC) offers Advanced Psychology practicum placements for doctoral students in regional training institutions. These placements are designed for graduate students who are beyond the beginning stages of training and clinical experience, and who are interested in attaining more advanced training within a university counseling center setting.

We seek students who can competently provide initial intake assessment (following in-depth training and supervision) and psychotherapy with a college student client population. Opportunities for outreach within the university are also available, and trainees are encouraged to attend various trainings and seminars throughout the year.

There is flexibility in terms of the weekly time commitment for an Advanced Practicum student, but we ask for a minimum of 15 hours per week and usually set a maximum of 20 hours per week. We ask students to commit to a two-semester experience in order to grasp the full experience of training in a university setting. Individual supervision with a pre-doctoral intern (who is in-turn supervised by a licensed psychologist) and group supervision with a licensed psychologist will be provided.

We view our trainees as a vital part of our Counseling Center Team and we are passionate about the training process. The training of clinically competent, ethical, self-aware, and culturally sensitive mental health professionals is one of the central missions of the CC. While members of the training staff represent several theoretical orientations (i.e., humanistic/existential, interpersonal, CBT, feminist, etc.), there is general consensus about the training model and learning atmosphere that we believe is conducive for optimal acquisition and integration of skills and competencies. We strive to create a challenging, intellectually stimulating, open environment where new ideas can be explored and nurtured. The staff encourages trainees to assess their professional strengths and deficits and assists them in developing appropriate learning experiences within the parameters of the opportunities offered here. An assumption of the staff is that optimal professional growth occurs when challenge is balanced with support. The model of training that we have adopted at the UNC Counseling Center is best described as a “developmental apprenticeship” approach. We aim to meet each trainee where he or she is at, and challenge them appropriately with varying clinical experiences and degrees of autonomy.

The Counseling Center bases all its programs and services, including training, on a philosophy that affirms the dignity of all people. The Center values pluralism and the opportunity for cross-cultural interactions within the campus community in order to enhance the educational environment for all students, staff, and faculty. We recognize that no individual is free from all forms of bias and prejudice. We expect staff and trainees to be committed to the social values of respect for diversity, inclusion and equality. Both trainers and trainees should demonstrate a willingness to examine their own assumptions, behaviors, and values so that they may work effectively with “cultural, individual, and role differences, including those based on age, gender, gender identity, race, ethnicity, culture, national origin, religion, sexual orientation, disability, language, and socioeconomic status” (APA Ethics Code, 2002, Principle E).

Requirements

  • Demonstrate desire to work with college population.
  • Ability to commit at least 15 hours a week.
  • Commitment of 2 semesters (fall and spring).
  • Commitment to attending weekly clinical staff meeting (Tuesdays 9:00-11:00 am)


Possible weekly activities include:

  1. Individual, couples therapy (7 hours)
  2. Individual supervision ( 1 hour)
  3. Weekly clinical meeting (2 hours)
  4. Group supervision (1 hour)
  5. Paperwork (2 hours)
  6. Intakes (2 hour per week )
  • Practicum students may attend optional training's and seminar opportunities throughout the year and may choose to participate in campus outreach opportunities.
  • Practicum students may be called upon to participate in various campus-wide mental health screenings through out the year (i.e., EDAW, National Depression Screening Week, Alcohol Awareness Week, etc.)

How to Apply:

  • Please submit a letter of interest
  • Curriculum Vitae
  • 3 Letters of Reference ( At least 2 of whom are familiar with your clinical work)

If selected for an interview, you will join us for a 1- hour in person interview.

Applications are due no later than March 3, 2014.

Please send application to:

University of Northern Colorado, Counseling Center
Attn: Sarah Griess, Ph.D., Training Director
Cassidy Hall, Campus Box 17
Greeley, Colorado 80639

or email to: sarah.griess@unco.edu

If you have questions about our training opportunities, please email or call Dr. Sarah Griess.
( 970-351-2496)

 

  • Cassidy BuildingStudents Walking