Research and Events

The School of Psychological Sciences at UNC is a leader in the state in conducting cutting edge research and preparing the researchers of tomorrow. Follow the links to the side to read about the exciting research projects going on and the awards being received by faculty and students.

Psi Chi: Spring 2013

Important dates for members:

  • Application deadline: March 15
  • Fee deadline: April 5
  • Inductions (MANDATORY): May 4 @ 11 am in Kepner, Milne Auditorium
  • Business casual dress
  • Cake and refreshments provided
  • Family and friends welcome!

Events:

  • Focus Sessions
    • Each month (roughly) we will try to have a professor/professional attend our meetings and give a short explanation of their field and what they do
    • If you were not at the meeting, please email Psi Chi (psi.chi@unco.edu) to inform us of your areas of interest so we can try to find someone to come in and talk
  • Kress Night
    • February 28 @ 6-6:30 pm
    • Movie starts at 7:30 pm
    • Funds will go to our Relay for Life team
  • Relay for Life
    • April 5-6 on the track in the gym
    • Dr. Seuss themed!
  • Boys and Girls Club
    • We are working with them to arrange taking kids to a game of some sort
    • Stay tuned for more information
  • RMPA
    • Psi Chi Leadership Event, April 11
    • We are trying to get a group together to carpool to Denver and attend the session
    • If you applied to attend RMPA:
    • We have grant money that you can apply for to help cover the cost
    • Contact us for more information
  • We are going to need officers for next semester!
    • If anyone is interested in any position, please contact us.
  • Weld County Food Bank
    • Still setting up date/time
    • We did this last year and it was a blast…free hair nets!
  • Miscellaneous
    • Field trips to sites were professionals in the field are working (outside the academic setting)

Kress Cinema Fund Raiser for Psi Chi:

  • Thursday, March 1; 6:00-10:00 pm
  • Come eat and watch a movie with 10% of all sales going to Psi Chi

Attention Undergraduates

For information regarding opportunities for undergraduate research, please go to http://www.unco.edu/hsl/our/ , where opportunities are listed by category and college.

Attention: All graduate students, faculty, instructors, and staff in the School of Psychological Sciences

You are invited to a Potluck Dinner to start off the beginning of a new academic year and welcome our new graduate students in Educational Psychology!

This event is being co-hosted by Teresa McDevitt and the Educational Psychology Society Officers

Please consider joining us and, if you’d like, bring significant others and family.

Please bring a food dish and a beverage to share.

  • When: Thurs., September 1, 6:00 – 9:00 PM
  • Where: McDevitt & Sheehan Household
    2588 55th Ave, Greeley, CO 80634
    (near Aims Community College)
    In case you need help with directions:
    Phone: 970-330-4515
    No RSVP is necessary

Attention Psychology Undergraduate and Graduate Students

Have you always wondered what kind of research the professors in Psychology are doing?

Are you interested in gaining research experience and would like to hear about opportunities?

If so, please attend the event listed below!

  • Event School of Psychological Sciences Annual Research Forum
  • When: Thursday – September 1, 2011 from 3:30-5:30 PM
  • Where: McKee Hall, Room 282 (2nd floor)

Details: Approximately 10 – 12 professors will discuss their research interests and whether they are currently recruiting research assistant volunteers. Feel free to drop by at any time between 3:30-5:30 PM. There will be faculty members from a number of different areas in Psychology, including Behavioral Neuroscience and Physiological Psychology, Educational Psychology, Cognitive Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Clinical Psychology, and Social Psychology. Refreshments will be served.


Office of Undergraduate Research Awards Summer Stipends:

Nicholas Broeker, Psychology major, "The Effect of Non-Linguistic Vocalizations on Emotion Perception." Broeker's research, which he recently presented at the National Conference on Undergraduate Research (NCUR) in Ithaca, NY, examines the effect that harsh music has on an individual's perception of facial expressions and emotions. This summer Broeker will research human vocalizations and explore stimuli, such as words and sentences that influence perceptions of facial emotions. "We believe that this research will help to further the understanding of how the human-threat detection system works in response to emotionally valence auditory stimuli," Broeker says.

Sara Pena, Psychology major, "Picture Me as Writer: Using Photoelicitation to Explore Writing Self-Efficacy of Struggling Writers." Pena received an Honorable Mention award and received $250 for research supplies. Pena's research addresses the relationship between efficacy, motivation, and literacy learning and considers approaches for using motivation to improve student performance. By using photographs to trigger ideas, emotions, and/or connections to help students articulate their sense of efficacy, Pena plans to research what educators can do to foster and increase self-efficacy among students. "This research will turn the same attention to writing performance as has been directed to mathematics and begin a discussion of what teachers can do to raise students' levels of self-efficacy as a means to improving not only engagement and motivation, but academic achievement in writing," Pena says.

 

 

Psychology Majors!!!

Are you interested in attending Grad School?

Do you have questions about applying or want more information?

You are invited to:

  • Psychology Grad Night
    Tuesday Nov. 8th at 5:00 P.M.
    UC Aspen Suites
  • Presenters will include:
    Drs. Phillips & Peterson
  • Refreshments will be served!
    Sponsored by Psi Chi

2011 Rocky Mountain Psychological Association conference , Salt Lake City, Utah

RMPA Presentations 2011 (PDF)


School of Psychological Sciences Colloquium

  • Title: Innovative Online Teaching
  • Speakers: Kathy Cochran, Ph.D. & Kevin Pugh, Ph.D.
  • When: Thursday - April 21, 12:20-1:20 PM
  • Where: McKee 282

Please join us for a colloquium given by Drs. Pugh and Cochran, faculty members in the School of Psychological Sciences. Each speaker will discuss their approach to teaching online courses, with useful examples and discussion.

Faculty and students welcome!


Psychology Networking Event

Tuesday, April 12, 2011

5:30-7:00 p.m. in McKee Hall


April 7, 2011

University Center 

Lowe, Elizabeth

Detecting response bias using the Test of Memory Malingering and the D-KEFS
Tower Test

Presenters: Lowe, Elizabeth
Undergraduate Presentation
Faculty sponsor: Dunn, Thomas
Psychology
Oral Presentation
Aspen B
01:20 - 01:35 in the Afternoon

Neuropsychological tools are used to gain more accurate insight about an
individual’s level of functioning (cognitive, behavioral, executive, etc.), and to
make more exact diagnoses; therefore, valid neuropsychological tools are
necessary for precise evaluation. Valid neuropsychological assessment relies
upon the individual putting forth maximum effort during testing. While the
literature is rich when describing methods of detecting incomplete effort, it is
sparse when identifying instruments resistant to such response bias. The goal
of this study was to determine whether or not effort affects performance on the
D-KEFS Tower Test by comparing the results with the Test of Memory
Malingering (a neuropsychological assessment designed to measure effort).
Thirty-nine neurologically intact college students from a medium sized Rocky
Mountain university introductory subject pool were asked to participate. The
participants in the experimental group were given a vignette explaining that
they had been in a car accident. The participants were then asked to pretend
that they had suffered a brain injury and were having memory problems. The
participants in the control group were asked to do their best. A blind examiner
administered the D-KEFS Tower Test and The Test of Memory Malingering
(TOMM) to both groups. Data analysis shows that there was a significant
difference between the two groups’ performance on the TOMM, but no
significant difference between the scores on the Tower Test. These results
suggest that the D-KEFS Tower Test is relatively resilient to incomplete effort.

Rodriguez, Paula

Effect of Learning Academy Intervention Model on Hispanic Student
Achievement

Presenters: Rodriguez, Paula
Graduate Presentation
Faculty sponsor: Karlin, Nancy
Educational Psychology
Oral Presentation
Columbine B
09:00 - 09:15 in the Morning

Purpose and Methodology: Between 1988 and 2008, the percentage of
public school students who were White decreased from 68 to 55 percent.
During this period the percentage of Hispanic students doubled from 11 to 22
percent, and in 2008, Hispanic enrollment exceeded 10 million students
(National Center for Educational Statistics [NCES], 2010). The National Center
for Educational Statistics also reported in 2007 that between 1997 and 2007,
25% of Hispanics were classified as school dropouts. It is because of the rapid
increase of Hispanic students entering the public school system and their high
rate of dropout that one high school in Northern Colorado decided to try to
increase graduation rates by forming a Learning Academy for at-risk students.
The author will follow the 86 students who completed the program during the
2009-2010 academic year through the 2010-2011 academic year to determine
if this program has a significant impact on Hispanic at-risk student achievement
and retention. The study hopes to show that decreased class size, shortened
class periods, and individualized attention will strongly correlate with
increased grade point averages, retention in school, and proficiency on the
CSAP for math and English. Data was collected for all of the participants in the
Learning Academy from the prior school year for GPA, CSAP, and English
language ability. This data will be compared to the data from these students for
the current school year who have been assimilated into regular classroom
environments.

Conclusion: The hypothesis that the Learning Academy Model would
positively and significantly impact GPA and school retention cannot be
substantiated. Further data analysis will be performed during the current
school year and numerical equivalence of CSAP data will be obtained to
determine what impact ESL, English language proficiency, gender, and language
spoken at home have on GPA and retention in school.

Sanchez, Lourdes

Effects of False-Evidence Ploys and Expert Testimony on Judge’s Verdicts:
Recommended Sentences, and Perceptions of Confession Evidence

Presenters: Sanchez, Lourdes
Undergraduate Presentation
Faculty sponsor: Woody, William
Psychology
Poster Presentation
Mt. Evans Ballroom
10:30 - 11:30 in the Morning

Abstract: Getting a suspect to confess is the goal of the interrogation
process. Some of the commonly used techniques that are used today to reach
that goal may result in false-confessions. Davis and Leo (2006) cite more than
300 cases of false confessions in literature while Drizen and Leo (2004)
documented 125 cases of proven false-confession in the literature. This area of
study is important because it can eliminate the number of innocent individuals
who have implicated themselves in serious crimes. For this study, 537 judges in
the Rocky Mountain region will be asked to complete a survey. The researchers
are investigating the participants’ perceptions of expert testimony, falseevidence
ploys, and their recommended sentences if they find the suspect
guilty. We hypothesize that judges will decrease sentences and verdicts because
they are required to sentence fairly and using false-evidence ploys and expert
testimony shall not create biases in sentencing recommendations.

Singletary, Stautcia

The Effects of Marijuana Use on College Students

Presenters: Singletary, Stautcia
Undergraduate Presentation
Faculty sponsor: Phillips, Kristina
Psychology
Poster Presentation
Mt. Evans Ballroom
10:30 - 11:30 in the Morning

Abstract: Marijuana use has been an increasing issue among college
students (Buckner, Ecker, & Cohen, 2010). Previous research has shown that
marijuana use can impair one’s ability to perform well academically and may
decrease a student’s motivation for learning. The focus of this study will be on
college students who use marijuana in the context of social facilitation, which
has been associated with higher risk of problematic marijuana use. More
research in this area may further understanding the use of marijuana on college
campuses as well as some risks that may be associated with students’ academic
success. Participants will be screened, interviewed, and given several
questionnaires regarding their marijuana use, academic performance and
context of use. Participants will also participate in the Ecological Momentary
Assessment (EMA), which measures marijuana use in “real time” (in the
moment). It is hypothesized that heavy marijuana-using college students who
use for social purposes will experience greater academic problems.

Spencer, Bryden

Profiles of Engagement: An Investigation of Transformative Learning
Experiences

Presenters: Spencer, Bryden; Pugh, Kevin; Russell, Cassendra
Graduate and Faculty Presentation Presentation
Faculty sponsor: Pugh, Kevin
Educational Psychology
Poster Presentation
Mt. Evans Ballroom
01:30 - 02:30 in the Afternoon

To foster transformative learning, we first need to identify and understand
patterns of engagement that encompass the transformational aspects. The
current study used cluster analysis within the framework of transformative
experience to develop profiles of engagement. Specifically, 65 middle school
students were interviewed and the three characteristics of transformative
experience (motivated use, expansion of perception, and experiential value)
were used as clustering variables. Three main clusters (low, medium, and high)
and seven subclusters of students were identified. Profiles of these clusters and
subclusters are presented in the paper. Students in clusters representing higher
levels of transformative engagement performed significantly better on a
learning assessment related to the content taught.

Broeker, Nicholas

The Effect of Dissonant Tones on Emotion Perception: Surprise vs. Fear

Presenters: Broeker, Nicholas
Undergraduate Presentation
Faculty sponsor: Peterson, Eric
Peterson, Eric
Oral Presentation
Aspen A
11:00 - 11:15 in the Morning

In this study, we evaluated the effects of dissonant tones on the the ability
of subjects to distinguish between surprise and fear. Although scientists have
long understood that dissonance arouses negative emotion, the mechanisms
remain poorly understood. For example, when Russian composer Igor
Stravinsky in 1913 premiered his ballet, “The Rite of Spring,” a highly dissonant
piece for its time, people began to riot. Additionally, evidence that four-monthold
infants show negative arousal to dissonance supports an inborn, universal
response to dissonant tones. Some research has suggested that emotional
response to dissonance reflects a shared underlying mechanism with fearinducing
alarm vocalizations. A working hypothesis is that these dissonant
tones may share acoustical characteristics with vocalizations that activate the
threat-detection system. This hypothetical model is consistent with
neuropsychological evidence that the amygdala, an important structure in many
social-cognitive processes, participates in both dissonance response and in
threat detection from human voices. To test this, we looked at the effect of
dissonance on face emotion perception, in particular, surprise versus fear. We
implemented a reaction time (RT) paradigm in which consonant or dissonant
tones were randomly presented for 1000 ms. Across the last 200 ms of this
stimulus, a face depicting surprise or fear was presented. Participants were
asked to identify the emotion depicted as quickly as possible (RT judgments).
We hypothesized that dissonant tones would activate the threat system and
predicted that this activation should induce a delay in RT or an increased error
in identifying emotion (incongruent stimuli pairings). Analyses of both RT and
error patterns yielded statistically significant support: RTs were significantly
faster for fear judgments following dissonance relative to consonance). These
results support our hypothesis that dissonance activates a threat mechanism
(likely innate) that influences emotion-face perception. Future efforts will
explore the relationship between these dissonant tones and the human voice,
and we are currently building human threat voice stimuli to implement in this
paradigm.

Boff, Jessica

Perceptions of Gangs and Members of Gangs from a General Perspective

Presenters: Boff, Jessica
Undergraduate Presentation
Faculty sponsor: Phillips, Michael
Criminal Justice, Psychology, Sociology
Poster Presentation
Mt. Evans Ballroom
10:30 - 11:30 in the Morning

To measure the general perceptions of gangs and gang members, a survey
was created. A total of 42 Colorado residents participated in the online survey,
with an age range of 18 to 60 years, and a variety of religious beliefs.
Perceptions of gangs and members included perceived knowledge about gangs,
experience, and stereotypes. Results concluded that opinions and beliefs about
gangs generally show a negative trend with few exceptions.


Hooks, Toni

Human Sex Differences in Frequency of Using Modern Technology to Access
Erotica

Presenters: Hooks, Toni
Undergraduate Presentation
Faculty sponsor: Dunn, Thomas
Poster Presentation
Mt. Evans Ballroom
10:30 - 11:30 in the Morning

Recently, research on gender differences has been commonplace with
typical topics being differences in sexual arousal (Fisher et. al.1986), use and
opinions of erotica (Attwood, 2005 and access of modern technology (Hasan,
2010). Despite this rich literature, there is a gap regarding the combination of
the three. In this quantitative study, a survey addressing the use of modern
technology (Internet, etc) to access erotica. Surveys will be distributed 50
college age men and women. From its analysis I hope to test my hypothesis that
there are human sex differences in the frequency of accessing sexually arousing
stimuli when using modern technology.


Dr. Thom Dunn will provide a research colloquium on Thursday, March 24, 12:20-1:20.

Title: Assessment of Response Bias in Neuropsychological Testing.

Place: McKee 127 (Dean’s Office conference room)


Career Services and Psychology Faculty invite you to engage with organizations about their employment opportunities.

Companies Registered so far:

  • Alternative Homes for Youth Mentors and Friends
  • Boys & Girls Club of GReeley
  • Centennial Mental Health Center
  • Colorado Department of Corrections
  • FBI
  • Reflections for the Youth

For questions or details please email elizabeth.overson@unco.edu or call 970-351-2127.

Preparations Workshops will be held next Monday and Tuesday March 28th and 29th in McKee. These workshops will help psychology majors get ready for the networking event.

The times for the Preparations Workshops are Monday March 28th from 12-1 pm in McKee 282, Tuesday March 29th from 12-1 pm in McKee 135, and Tuesday 29th from 4:30-5:30 in McKee 282. Pizza will be served at the workshops.


Graduate School Information Night

Psychology Majors and Minors are you Interested in Graduate School?

Do you want to learn about:

  • The application process
  • What kinds of degrees you can earn
  • Possible careers, etc.?

Join Us!

  • When: Wednesday, March 23rd at 5:30 p.m.
  • Where: The UC Columbine Room

Research Colloquium

  • Dr. Thom Dunn
  • What: Assessment of Response Bias in Neuropsychological Testing.
  • When: Thursday, March 24, 12:20-1:20.
  • What: McKee 127 (Dean's Office conference room)

Research Colloquium:

  • Dr. Nancy Karlin
  • What We Need to Understand About the Disparities Among Hispanic and non-Hispanic White Caregivers
  • When: Thursday, November 11, 3:30-4:30
  • Where: Psychological Sciences Conference Room (McKee 020)

Dr. Doug Woody and Dr. Wayne Viney Debate: Free Will vs. Determinism

  • Tuesday, October 26 4:00 pm
  • Ross Hall 1040
  • Sponsored by Psi Chi

Development of a risk reduction intervention to reduce bacterial and viral infections among injection drug users

  • Research Colloquium: given by Kristina Phillips, Ph.D., faculty member in the School of Psychological Sciences.
  • Title:Development of a risk reduction intervention to reduce bacterial and viral infections among injection drug users
  • When:Thurs., Oct. 7, 3:30 – 4:30 PM
  • Where:Psychology Conference Room

School of Psychological Sciences Presents Paul E. Rapp

  • Department of Military and Emergency Medicine
  • Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences
  • September 29, 2010 - 4:00 p.m.
  • McKee 333

CNS Synchronization Abnormalities and Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

In some instances, individuals receiving closed skull head injuries do not present symptoms in the immediate post-injury period. They can, however, present significant delayed onset impairment of cognitive and affective processing. This diagnostic challenge has motivated the search for more consistently disclosing indications of early stage mild traumatic brain injury that can identify at-risk patients before the appearance of overt symptoms. Light refreshments will be served.

  • Paul E. Rapp
  • Department of Military and Emergency Medicine
  • Traumatic Injury Research Program
  • Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences
  • Bethesda, MD

School of Psychological Sciences Second Annual Research Forum

Attention Psychology Undergraduate and Graduate Students:

Have you always wondered what kind of research the professors in Psychology are doing?

Are you interested in gaining research experience and would like to hear about opportunities?

If so, please attend the event listed below!

  • Event: School of Psychological Sciences Second Annual Research Forum
  • When: Thursday, 9/2/10 from 3:30-5:15 PM
  • Where: McKee Hall, Rm 282 (2nd floor)

Details: Approximately 10 professors will discuss their research interests and whether they are currently recruiting research assistant volunteers. Feel free to drop by at any time between 3:30-5:15 PM. There will be faculty members from a number of different areas in Psychology, including Behavioral Neuroscience and Physiological Psychology, Educational Psychology, Cognitive Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Clinical Psychology, and Social Psychology. Refreshments will be served.


RESEARCH COLLOQUIUM

School of Psychological Sciences

Please join us for a research colloquium given by Sarah Wilson, doctoral student in the Educational Psychology program.

  • Title:  Vocational Knowledge among Children: A Study of Individual Differences and Predictors on Occupational Aspirations and Expectations
  • When:  Thurs., April 29, 12:20 – 1:20 PM
  • Where:  Psychology Conference Room

Research Colloquium:

  • Doctoral Student Cassendra Russell
  • Goal Orientation and Problem-Based Learning Environments
  • Thursday March 25
  • 12:20-1:20
  • McKee Hall 20

Exploring Meta-Analysis through the Eyes Test by Crystal Baker and Rena Kirkland

Please join the Educational Psychology Society this Tuesday (March 30) for a presentation titled: 

  • Exploring Meta-Analysis through the Eyes Test by Crystal Baker and Rena Kirkland
  • When: Tuesday March 30th @ 1pm
  • Where: McKee Room 20 in the conference room
  • Crystal and Rena will be presenting their preliminary meta-analysis results on the Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test. Gender differences and correlation with IQ will be discussed.
  • Light refreshments will be served.

The School of Psychological Sciences and Psi Chi will be providing dinner at the Guadalupe Homeless Shelter in Greeley on March 4.

For more information contact Cheryl Tsikewa (Cherylynn.tsikewa@unco.edu) or Dr. Nancy Karlin (nancy.karlin@unco.edu).


Paper to be presented at the American Psychology-Law Society Convention

Dr. Doug Woody, graduate student Josh Stewart, and undergraduates Alexis Walker, Genieva Barfield, Matt Ponzi (class of ’09), and Skye Woestehoff coauthored a paper to be presented at the American Psychology-Law Society Convention in Vancouver B.C., March 2010.  Skye and Alexis will deliver the presentation: False confession plausibility as a predictor of juror’s decisions and evaluations of police deception. 


“Dealing with the Big D: Tips from dissertation focused Grad Students”

  • Graduate Student Panel
  • Tuesday, February 23
  • 1:00-2:00 pm
  • McKee 20 (Psychology Conference Room)

Openness, Transparency, and Accountability: Fostering Public Trust in Higher Education presented by Dr.  John Cooney

  • Thursday, February 25
  • 12-1pm
  • McKee 20 (Psychology Conference Room)

The event is open to all faculty, students, and staff of UNC.  This presentation will be a potluck, so feel free to bring your favorite dish!


Psi Chi is hosting a movie and pizza night

Psi Chi is hosting a movie and pizza night on February 16th at 5:30pm, in McKee 019/020 to raise money for Haiti relief.  Psi Chi will pay for the movie and food, but ask that those attending bring a $5 donation.  Anyone is welcome to attend and any donation is a help. 


“Artistic & Musical Development”

  • Presented by Ed Psych graduate students
  • Cassie Russell, & Karen Schmidt
  • Tuesday, January 26th
  • 1:00-2:00 pm
  • McKee 0020 (the Conference Room)
  • Artistic Musical Developement (PDF)

Stressed Out? Running on Auto-Pilot?

The UNC Ed Psych Society Presents: an interactive introduction to Mindful Living presented by Dr. Steve Quackenbush, Ed.S., UNC Counseling Center Staff & facilitator of the Mindful Living group. Mindfulness can help you reduce anxiety, relax, focus, and be more aware of your behaviors, thoughts, and environment.

Thursday, November 19th, 11:00am-12:00pm, McKee 0020

Please contact Karen Schmidt for more information, or visit the Educational Psychology Society Web site.


Research Colloquium

Wednesday, November 18, 12:20 – 1:10 PM in McKee 423
Elyse Manteris, Comorbidity and Social Cognition in ADHD and Autism Spectrum Disorders

Elyse is a graduate student in school psychology who is beginning her dissertation research with Dr. Peterson.


Psi Chi Fall Semester Inductions

Psi Chi Fall Semester Inductions will be held Saturday, November 21st at 11:00 am in Milne auditorium, Kepner Hall. Friends, Family, and Faculty are welcome!


Dr. Allan Collins is coming to UNC to speak about Booze and Butts!

Dr. Collins earned the Ph.D. (Pharmaceutical Sciences) in 1970 based on a research project that focused on identifying the cell type in mammalian testes that produces myo-inositol. He abandoned reproductive biology in his first postdoctoral appointment when he moved into the liver (enzymology of aldehyde dehydrogenases) and abandoned the liver in his second postdoc when he studied the effects of alcohol on monoamine metabolism in the brain. In 1972, he was hired as an Assistant Professor at the University of Colorado with a joint appointment in the School of Pharmacy and the Institute for Behavioral Genetics.  For the last 37 years, he’s been using genetic and behavioral approaches to study tobacco (nicotine) and alcohol addiction, using mouse models.  Somehow, despite the fact that he has absolutely no formal training in either genetics or behavior, he has managed to publish over 280 peer-reviewed papers (several, he notes with pride, might be worth reading) in these areas.  He has received Research Scientist, Career and MERIT Awards from NIH, the Langley Award from SRNT and, most recently, the University of Colorado’s Distinguished Researcher Award. 

  • Free Event
  • When: Tuesday, Nov. 3rd 5 P.M.
  • Where: McKee L0151
  • Sponsored by Psi Chi

UNC’s Psi Chi Chapter presents

The Debate of the Semester between Dr. Doug Woody and Dr. Steven Pulos:
"Psychology and the Law"
When: October 27, 2009 at 4:00 p.m.
Where: Michener Lower Level, room L0074


Dr. Thom Dunn recently published an article with our former undergraduate student Chris Immel (class of 2004):

Immel, C.S. & Dunn, T.M. (2009). Simulation training for wildland firefighters: Fidelity of fire shelter deployment.Modern Psychological Studies, 14, 10-16.


Psychology Majors

  • Do you have questions about grad school?
  • Do you what more information on psychology career options?

Come to Grad/Career Night!

Your Psi Chi chapter at UNC is hosting an evening of information on Graduate school and Career opportunities. Come one . . . Come ALL!!!!!

  • Tuesday, October 6, 2009 - 5:30 P.M.
  • McKee Hall 282
  • We look forward to seeing you there.
  • Psi Chi UNC Chapter 2009 - 2010

Educational Psychology Society

The Educational Psychology Society will be meeting on the second Thursday of each month.  The first presentation entitled “What you need to do to Graduate” presented by Dr. Marilyn Welsh will be on Thursday October 8, 2009 from 11:00-12:00 in the psychology conference room (McKee Hall 0020).


Attention Psychology Undergraduate and Graduate Students:

Have you always wondered what kind of research the professors in Psychology are doing?

Are you interested in gaining research experience and would like to hear about opportunities?

If so, please attend the event listed below!

  • Event: School of Psychological Sciences First Annual Research Forum
  • When: Tuesday, 9/22/09 from 4:00-6:00 PM
  • Where: McKee Hall 0020 (basement), Psychology Conference Room

Details: Approximately 10 professors will discuss their research interests and whether they are currently recruiting research assistant volunteers. Feel free to drop by at any time between 4:00-6:00 PM. There will be faculty members from a number of different areas in Psychology, including Behavioral Neuroscience and Physiological Psychology, Educational Psychology, Cognitive Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Clinical Psychology, and Social Psychology.


Joshua Stewart will be talking on Thursday, March 26th on the topic of  "Brain Development After Prenatal Alcohol Exposure."

Joshua will discuss research on alcohol exposure and consequent learning effects using data he has gathered in Dr. Gilliam's lab.  The goal of this research is to aid educators in assisting FAS children.

The talk will be held in the Educational Psychology lounge, room 424, (4th floor McKee) at 11AM, and refreshments and snacks will be provided. 


Hal Mansfield speak about cults, gangs, and hate group

Come hear Hal Mansfield speak about cults, gangs, and hate groups. The event will be hosted by Psi Chi and we will be going to Fat Albert’s Restaurant for dinner at 7:00 p.m.
Anyone who is interested is welcome to attend dinner and the speech!


Brain Development After Prenatal Alcohol Exposure - March 5th

Educational Psychology graduate student Joshua Stewart will be talking on Thursday, March 5th on the topic of "Brain Development After Prenatal Alcohol Exposure."

Joshua will discuss research on alcohol exposure and consequent learning effects using data he has gathered in Dr. Gilliam's lab.  Children with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) have been shown to have learning problems associated with attention deficits, which may result from hyperactivity. Joshua and his collaborators are mapping out which types of FAS symptoms can be expected based upon when the ethanol insult occurred in the third trimester of pregnancy. The goal of this research is to aid educators in assisting FAS children.

The talk will be held in the Educational Psychology lounge, room 424, (4th floor McKee) at 11AM, and refreshments and snacks will be provided. 


research on the development of size perception in children

Dr. Carl Granrud will discuss research on the development of size perception in children.  His experiments on the topic have focused on whether age-related improvements in size estimation ability result from increased sensitivity to visual cues for size or from increased use of deliberate size estimation strategies.

The talk, sponsored by the Educational Psychology Society, will be held in the Educational Psychology lounge, room 424, (4th floor McKee) at 11AM, and refreshments and cookies will be provided.


 

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