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Thom Dunn

Thom Dunn

Professor

Psychological Sciences
Education and Behavioral Sciences

Contact Information

Phone
970-351-1501
Office
McKee Hall 14S
Mailing Address
University of Northern Colorado
Psychological Sciences
Campus Box 94
Greeley, CO 80639

Education

Ph.D. - University of Cincinnati

M.A. - University of Cincinnati

B.S. - Allegheny College

Professional/Academic Experience

Thom Dunn has been on faculty at the University of Northern Colorado since 2000. A Colorado native, Dr. Dunn returned to the state in 1999 after completing a Ph.D. in clinical neuropsychology at the University of Cincinnati and clinical internship at the Salt Lake City VA Medical Center.

Professor Dunn is internationally known for his pioneering research on the study of pathologically healthful eating. His research has been reported by such media outlets such as the Wall Street Journal, CNN, NPR, the BBC, Popular Science, and the CBC.

In addition to his teaching and research activities, Dr. Dunn dedicates a small amount of time as an active clinical psychologist at Denver Health Medical Center. He serves as a faculty member to the University of Colorado’s Medical School’s psychosomatic medicine fellowship program. He also sits on Denver Health’s bioethics committee and is the chair of the Colorado Psychological Association’s Ethics Committee.

Research/Areas of Interest

Dr. Dunn has taught a number of undergraduate and graduate courses, including Physiological Psychology, Statistics, Abnormal Psychology, Clinical Psychology, and Industrial/Organizational Psychology. He developed the courses Psychology of Human Sexuality, Psychopharmacology, and Biological Bases of Behavior for UNC. He has also previously taught Clinical Neuropsychology, Cognition, Tests and Measures, and Child and Adolescent Psychology.

His research interests are varied, generally involving the intersection between medicine and psychology. Specifically, Professor Dunn is interested in eating disorders that lead to malnutrition, but do not have a body image component, such as Avoidant/Restrictive Food Intake Disorder, as well as Orthorexia Nervosa (pathologically healthful eating).

Publications/Creative Works

Missbach, B., Dunn, T. M., & König, J. S. 2017. We need new tools to assess orthorexia nervosa. A commentary on “prevalence of orthorexia nervosa among college students based on Bratman’s Test and associated tendencies.” Appetite, 108, 521 -524.

 Bennett, S. L., Dunn, T. M., Lashen, G.T., Grant, J.V., Gaudiani, J.L., Mehler, P.S. 2017.  When avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder becomes life threatening: A case report of an adult male patient. Colorado Journal of Psychiatry and Psychology, 2, 23-28.

 Dunn, T.M., Gibbs, J. Whitney, N and Starosta, A. (2016). Prevalence of orthorexia nervosa is less than 1%: Data from a U.S. sample. Eating and Weight Disorders: Studies in Anorexia, Bulimia and Obesity, 21, 1-8.

 Ross, L.M, Dunn, T.M. and Lozano, A. (2016). Suicide attempt by anaphylaxis. Psychosomatics, 57, 226 – 227.

 Dunn, T.M. & Bratman, S. (2016). On orthorexia nervosa: A review of the literature and proposed diagnostic criteria. Eating Behaviors, 21, 11-17.